International Depository Receipt

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International Depository Receipt (IDR)

A receipt issued by a bank as evidence of ownership of one or more shares of the underlying stock of a foreign corporation that the bank holds in trust. The advantage of the IDR structure is that the corporation does not have to comply with all the issuing requirements of the foreign country where the stock is to be traded. The US version of the IDR is the American Depository Receipt (ADR).

International Depository Receipt

A certificate issued by a bank representing shares of a stock the bank holds in trust but that are traded on a foreign stock exchange. The IDR is denominated in the local currency, and entitles the bearer to any dividends and other benefits associated with the shares. IDRs can be traded like any other security. Using IDRs shields the investor from foreign exchange risk and any applicable tariffs he/she would have had to pay if he/she had bought the stock outright. It also exempts the investor from any requirements the foreign exchange might have levied. It is also known as a global depository receipt (GDR). See also: American Depository Receipt.
References in periodicals archive ?
IDRS IDRS is one of the UK's leading dispute resolution providers offering mediation, conciliation, adjudication, early neutral evaluation and arbitration services, and more in the UK and overseas IDRS deliver professional, accessible and effective dispute resolution services with independence, integrity and impartiality for:
1 shows a comparison of the sensitivity and specificity of IDRS and genotyping for identifying individuals with undiagnosed diabetes.
Both the IDRS and genotyping miss 9 NDD subjects identified via OGTT (Fig.
The cost of IDRS screening for all 961 study subjects was [?
Using IDRS screening prior to OGTT, reduces costs while still detecting a substantial portion of NDD individuals.
For example, manpower costs of conducting IDRS screening would likely be much higher in a developed country.
Given the potential for differential acceptability of the various screening tests described here and the programmatic challenges of training interviewers to provide IDRS screening, we note the need for additional research assessing the long-term cost-effectiveness of each alternative.
A potential additional benefit of both the IDRS and genotyping is their ability to identify individuals who currently do not have diabetes but are at high risk of developing diabetes in the future.
We have earlier shown that IDRS helps in identifying subjects with metabolic syndrome and coronary artery disease in the population (23).
As all these factors are included in IDRS, it is not surprising that IDRS proved to identify more individuals with undiagnosed T2DM than genotyping.