Internet

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Internet

a global ‘web’ of COMPUTER networks which use the same agreed ‘protocols’ (agreed methods of communication). The WORLD WIDE WEB (www or ‘the web’) is a vast collection of computers able to support multi-media formats and accessible via web-browsers' (search and navigation tools). Data stored in these computers (‘servers’) is organized into pages with hypertext links, each page having a unique address.

Connection to the web usually requires access to a personal computer, a modem and a telephone line, although it is now possible to receive television-based Internet services.

The Internet is increasingly used by businesses for the conduct of electronic commerce (E-COMMERCE, for short), and has thus provided a new powerful alternative means to conventional distribution channels of selling goods. See MARKET.

In 2004 around 9 million households in the UK owned personal computers with some 7 million of these using the Internet. The number of people worldwide using the Internet is estimated at 300 million and rising rapidly. See CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT.

Internet

a global ‘web’ of COMPUTER networks that use the same agreed ‘protocols’ (agreed methods of communication). The WORLD WIDE WEB (www or ‘the web’) is a vast collection of computers able to support multimedia formats and accessible via ‘web-browsers’ (search and navigation tools). Data stored in these computers (‘servers’) is organized into pages with hypertext links, each page having a unique address.

Connection to the web usually requires access to a personal computer, a modem and a telephone line, although it is now possible to receive television-based Internet services.

The Internet is increasingly used by businesses for the conduct of electronic commerce (E-COMMERCE, for short) and has thus provided a new powerful alternative means to conventional distribution channels of selling goods. This has helped many smaller firms to break into markets previously dominated by large companies.

See BARRIERS TO ENTRY.