Society

(redirected from Human societies)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Society

A group of persons who, by accident or design, are related to each other in some way and therefore have to deal with each other. Examples of societies include everyone who attends the same church, lives in the same country, or belongs to the same club. According to most political and economic theories, persons in a society have the responsibility to care for other members of that society, though exactly how to do so remains a matter of contention. While some theories emphasize the role of society, more individualistic theories tend to minimize its role.
References in periodicals archive ?
Twenty-three international academics and researchers from the fields of anthropology, psychology, animal behavior, evolutionary ecology, economics, and sociology contribute 16 chapters examining the provision of offspring care within a wide range of human societies.
Our earliest human ancestors most likely had big babies too and this could have helped define the shape of modern human societies, research has suggested.
Focusing on "extreme rapid social change," the authors present students and fellow researchers with the theoretical foundations of the evolution of human societies, the study of societies before and after the Industrial Revolution and modern issues of industry, art, leisure and communication.
One would thus have had to say, a century and a half ago, that slavery should not be abolished, because it was customary in almost all human societies.
Vocal dialects and other social customs proliferate in human societies.
Admitting that the church had a history meant that it, too, had changed substantially, like other human societies.
As noted in the first chapter devoted to explain the need for a theoretical formulation, all human societies cope with sickness and disability.
Goldberg has shown, and Margaret Mead agreed, that despite astonishing differences in human societies, past and present, all have been patriarchal.
CI is currently working on projects in more than 40 countries on four continents to protect global biodiversity and demonstrate that human societies can live harmoniously with nature.
Beginning his narrative in the era prior to the arrival of humans, he generally takes a material approach that concerns itself with changes in biological and physical environments, and how those changes affect human societies, although by the time he gets to the late 19th century more of the concerns of political and cultural environmental history do begin to find their way into the discussion.
Monkeys might help illuminate human child neglect, but the diverse forms and causes of child abuse in human societies probably do not have counterparts in nonhuman primates, argues primatologist William A.