Common Good

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Common Good

That which is seen as best for a whole community and not simply for any individual or small group within that community. This may be seen in purely utilitarian ways, but it may be founded upon natural law theory. The ideas behind law and democracy assume that the common good is something that can be achieved, or at least should be pursued. Proponents of both regulation and deregulation (or almost any other policy) believe their views best suit the common good.
References in periodicals archive ?
A realistic conception of the human good requires the devolution of authority to local communities, on the one hand, and a proper distinction between the spiritual and temporal powers on the other.
One can hardly deny that language of the kingdom finds precedent in Sacred Scripture, but a theory focused primarily on fundamental human goods overlooks the substantial and Three-Personed Good, the source and summit of all goodness, the one who in his goodness loves us infinitely, the one who because of his goodness is infinitely loveable.
individual and communal human goods (when something is good because it is something that an individual person qua human being or society qua human should make a place for in its life).
And this quest will eventually bring one back to the underived first principles of practical reasonableness--principles which make no reference at all to human nature, but only to human good.
It is a Christian voice that will offer a rationale for human good, without which both high schools and universities will come up short in addressing these issues.
Not only does suicide consist of a deliberate destruction of a basic human good (life) for the realization of no other intelligible good, (51) it also prevents the perpetrator-victim from making any future pursuits of human goods.
They are rooted in grave misunderstandings of human nature and the human good.
Aristotle's ethics famously moves from an understanding of the human good as excellence (eudamonia) to an account of virtue, which instantiates the human good, to a description of the highest activity of contemplation.
How to give proper expression to the human good and human flourishing when there are few if any "life-plans" left to pursue and when the experience of time becomes the daily round in the nursing home instead of a straight path stretching ahead toward the future?
We are obliged to learn how this magnificent idea functions as an actual source of human good and ill, in the past and still.
Lynch explains why he feels limitation and finitude is the great human good.
Eye of the heart : knowing the human good in the euthanasia debate.

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