Common Good

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Common Good

That which is seen as best for a whole community and not simply for any individual or small group within that community. This may be seen in purely utilitarian ways, but it may be founded upon natural law theory. The ideas behind law and democracy assume that the common good is something that can be achieved, or at least should be pursued. Proponents of both regulation and deregulation (or almost any other policy) believe their views best suit the common good.
References in periodicals archive ?
The standard of balance in this human ecology is the standard of the human good, which seeks laughter and leisure as earnestly as it demands their material and social conditions.
and the intellectual virtue of practical wisdom (hereafter simply "virtues") are necessary for flourishing both because they are instrumental means to the generic and individual human goods that are necessary for flourishing and because they are partial realizations or constituents of it (pp.
A realistic conception of the human good requires the devolution of authority to local communities, on the one hand, and a proper distinction between the spiritual and temporal powers on the other.
But like the egoistic claim that acting for the common human good is always good for me, the convergence hypothesis is poorly supported by evidence.
What a sharp contrast this provides to the defective mentality that argues that the liturgy is primarily a means of fulfilling one's self and expressing the community's values and interests, as if the human good were the measure of all things.
And this quest will eventually bring one back to the underived first principles of practical reasonableness--principles which make no reference at all to human nature, but only to human good.
It is a Christian voice that will offer a rationale for human good, without which both high schools and universities will come up short in addressing these issues.
Not only does suicide consist of a deliberate destruction of a basic human good (life) for the realization of no other intelligible good, (51) it also prevents the perpetrator-victim from making any future pursuits of human goods.
And Stemagen's motives appear to be primarily driven by the pursuit of the greatest possible human good and welfare.
In light of what I have already said about how natural law theorists understand human nature and the human good, it should be no surprise that natural law theorists typically reject both strict individualism and collectivism.
BIOTECHNOLOGY AND THE HUMAN GOOD charts the latest arguments over recent developments in reproductive and genetic science, building a case for stewardship routed in Judeo-Christian theism.
While readers will likely be as entranced with mystery of Birthday as are his fictional protagonists, they, too, must be patient with its twisting plot to grasp Suzuki's cautionary message about life, human good and evil, and the inevitability of aging and death.

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