Hezbollah

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Related to Hizbullah: Isis, Hamas

Hezbollah

A Shi'a Muslim political party and paramilitary organization in Lebanon. Hezbollah was established in the 1980s in response to the Israeli invasion of Lebanon in 1982. It operates a number of social services, though some countries regard it as a terrorist organization. It was responsible for the capture and killing of two Israeli soldiers in a cross-border raid, an incident that led to the 2006 Israel-Lebanon War. This war, and Hezbollah's response to it, increased the organization's popularity in Lebanon among Sunni Muslims, Christians and others.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Safawi ideology, developed in the 16th century AD in Persia, has since spread across the Shi'ite world through the IRGC and Hizbullah.
Netanyahu, whose Israeli forces have struck Hizbullah convoys in Syria, is likely to make the pitch that sidelining Hizbullah is good for the security of the volatile Mideast, analysts say.
Observers were in position to wait and see whether or not Hizbullah meant what it had said.
According to the source, other resolutions, of which Hizbullah is critical, include UNSCR 1757 which established the controversial Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) which is currently probing the 2005 assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik al-Hariri.
Secondly, it is clear that Hizbullah, when it decided to take the road of a confrontation with the U.
Ali Tajideen was alleged to have provided Hizbullah with several payments over a number of years -- the largest coming in $1 million installments.
Hizbullah is believed to have extensive terror infrastructure in Africa and South America and was allegedly behind the Buenos Aires bombings in 1992 and 1994.
Hizbullah has a reputation of being able to carry out such complex operations, in contrast to the more amateurish JaM.
Had commentators and audiences spent time exploring those phenomena rather than unthinkingly describing Hizbullah as terroristic, the boundaries of debate might have shifted in productive ways.
Throughout, Qassem argues that Hizbullah should be considered primarily an Islamic political party and a legitimate, even moderate, social movement rather than simply a terrorist organization.
Violence is expected to intensify against both Israel and the Arab regimes, spearheaded, on the Arab side, by radical Islamist movements like Hamas and Hizbullah and, on the Israeli side, by Jewish fundamentalists.