hit

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Hit

A unit measuring a person or IP address visiting a website. In general, the more hits a website generates, the higher revenue it earns from advertising and other sources.

hit

1. To sell a security at a bid price quoted by a dealer. For example, a trader will hit a bid.
2. To lose money on a trade. For example, a dealer may take a hit on the holdings of Moore's Fried Foods' common stock.
References in periodicals archive ?
for racial profiling would predict, the hit rate for drugs and
Only one participant who had used the I Ching previously scored a second-hexagram hit, so that the hit rate for second-hexagram hitting was an effect produced almost entirely by nonusers (i.
An RAF spokesman said appalling weather and mountains had made it "impossible" to accurately check the hit rate.
One study of 29 music, drama, and dance students yielded a hit rate of one in two, one of the highest reported for a ganzfeld session.
CoreLogic, the leading provider of mortgage risk assessment and fraud prevention solutions, announced significant enhancements to its cascading Automated Valuation Model (AVM) solution, AVMSelect[TM], that delivers increased hit rates and valuation accuracy within its standard system while enabling cascade customization at a greater level of detail where needed.
The standard ganzfeld studies form a highly significant and consistent database with an overall hit rate of 36% (40% in the case of auditory monitored studies) and a mean effect size of 0.
He added that while the volume of work the company is bidding this year is up over last year, "our hit rate is lower, given the heightened level of competition we're seeing in the markets of both of our divisions.
A binomial hit rate measure was prespecified as the outcome for this study, with a rank of 1 or 2 to the actual target considered a hit (MCE=.
The CL1-Ganzfeld study produced a total of 18 hits in 50 sessions for a hit rate of 36% (z = 1.
Out of 70 target customers, we achieved a phenomenal hit rate of 40 percent and have subsequently built a pipeline, comprising software, hardware and consultancy.
On purely statistical grounds, the first series (Honorton, 1985) provided very strong support for the existence of ESP, with a mean success rate of 38 percent, to be compared with a hit rate of 25 percent expected by chance, a highly significant result (p [less than] [10.