Admiralty Court

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Admiralty Court

Any court that has jurisdiction over maritime law. This jurisdiction covers criminal and civil law, torts, and many other things. In the United Kingdom, admiralty courts sit very rarely. In the United States, ordinary federal district courts are considered admiralty courts when the dispute involves maritime law.
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44) High Court of Admiralty, Examinations, 31, 10 de junio de 1594 y 10, 11, 21 y 29 de octubre de 1594.
Vease tambien High Court Of Admiralty, Examinations, 16, 16 de abril de 1567; 11, 23 de octubre de 1567, 25 de noviembre de 1567, 24 de enero de 1568.
49) High Court of Admiralty, Examinations, 21, 3 de mayo de 1575, 13 de junio de 1575; Libels, 47, no.
51) Se conservan marcas de mercaderes en la High Court of Admiralty y en los Libros Portuarios.
The unfortunate Erizzo, aware as he was of the fact that it was a difficult undertaking to sue Corsi, considering that he enjoyed the protection of the lord admiral Sir Thomas Seymour, ventured to take the case to the High Court of Admiralty.
The rare spectacle the Edwardian Londoners saw in the city and the High Court of Admiralty on 8 February 1548 was the fashioning of a black African witness dressed up in European clothes bought in Southampton.
The Italian witnesses were not aware that the judges of the High Court of Admiralty were facing a historic case for which in terms of the common law there was no judicial precedent and no past decision to draw upon.
The Vice-Admiralty Courts are branches of the High Court of Admiralty in England; the Judges are appointed from England, and we pay them; the process of these Courts is the same obtained in the Court of Admiralty.
Upon the commencement of the Supreme Court of Judicature Act, 1873 (65) in 1875, the old High Court of Admiralty and the common law courts were fused and the jurisdiction of each of the former courts was transferred to the new High Court of Justice.
Those statutes had been adopted following the enlightened leadership of the celebrated Lord Stowell, Judge of the High Court of Admiralty from 1798 to 1827.
The estimates were made by the High Court of Admiralty, ostensibly through due process.