High-Context Culture

(redirected from High Context Cultures)

High-Context Culture

A culture in which a great deal of emphasis is placed upon the context, tone or circumstance of words used in addition to the meaning of the words themselves. For example, suppose one says, "I am fine," in response to the question, "How are you?" In a high-context culture, it should not necessarily be assumed that one is doing fine and that no further query needs to be made. Confusing cultural signals between a high-context and a low-context culture can create significant misunderstandings in both business and politics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, an important finding in our study is that even though individuals from high context cultures are significantly less certain about communication overall, neither CA nor SPCC is predictive of communication certainty in either intracultural or intercultural relationships for those from high-context cultures.
Italy's cultural diversity, regional identity, and linguistic plurality form a sort of cultural syncretism capable of comprehending the tenets and the necessary characteristics of low context and high context cultures.
It is so because high context cultures communicate primarily by means of inferences (subcodes), which are not necessarily forms of meaning capable of being decoded by anyone, but they are messages extended to other content levels or levels of signification and properly identifiable as senses.
As we anticipated in the opening remarks, Italian culture, more than any other culture, is in the position of playing a role of appeasement between the West and the Middle East insofar as it is endowed with a long lasting cultural syncretism capable of communicating well with both low context and high context cultures.
High context cultures rely primarily on non-verbal communication (Simintiras and Thomas 1998), often drawing conclusions from informal interactions and other non-verbal variables such as values, status, and associations (Keegan 1989).
Thus high context cultures do not require a great deal of information.
And I also knew that many stage 1 and stage 2 errors happen when people from low and high context cultures interact, especially when conditioned behaviors and evaluations are transferred to a new situation without delaying reactions.
Everyone knows not to do this" is a valid claim for a high context culture where rules are implicit and rarely, if ever, broken.
High context cultures, on the other hand, derive meaning from the context rather than the actual words.
Because of this, high context cultures tend to be more group oriented and hierarchical.
Furthermore, high context cultures tend to place greater emphasis on nonverbal communication, while low context cultures place the emphasis on verbal communication (Hall, 1976).
As Augsburger (1992) maintains, the concept of "face" in high context cultures is very closely tied to the concepts of honor, shame, and obligation.
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