Henri Fayol


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Henri Fayol

A French mining company manager who devised one of the first systematic management systems. Fayol asserted that management had six goals: forecasting, planning, organizing, commanding, coordinating and controlling. He argued that employees must be expected to follow rules, but managers must compensate them appropriately and treat them fairly. According to Fayol, both employees and employers must subordinate their individual goals to those of the whole company. He lived from 1841 to 1925.
References in periodicals archive ?
About the same time, in France, Jules Henri Fayol concluded that management needed five basic administrative functions (planning, organising, commanding, coordinating and controlling).
Peya, like Henri Fayol, envisions the organization of modern African societies as a " Unity of Meaning, " and a " Unity of Order.
Equally noteworthy are mentions of Right-wing willingness to adopt Briandist foreign policy, mass mobilization through advertising and film, and Taylorism and state intervention in the economy (albeit wedded to the proto-monarchist organizational model of Henri Fayol for social-Darwinist ends).
Another very important individual during this era, or in this aspect of managerial concepts, was a French engineer named Henri Fayol.
The foundational literature of management--the works of Henri Fayol (7) and Chester Barnard (8)--focused on extracting general principles from their years of experience, observation and practice.
This is not a new concept; even Henri Fayol, the early French organisational management writer, referred to 'Fayol's Bridge' and the importance of communication across formal boundaries.
Many credit Henri Fayol, Fredrick Taylor, Lillian Gilbreth, Mary Parker Follett and others as pioneers who developed today's modern management techniques.
He would have also found it hard to credit the notion that he would be quoted as one of a trinity of management pioneers, along with Henri Fayol and FW Taylor, contemporaries whom he would not have known or read.
Starting from the early nineteenth century, when the British mathematician Charles Babbage & Henri Fayol in France perceived that the methods of science and mathematics could be applied to the operation of factories, it was Frederick Taylor who advocated that scientific management could be utilized to address such problems of industry as the nuclear concepts of management responsibility, lack of measurable standards for defining workers tasks, and widespread inefficiency of labour and persistent 'soldiering on the job'.
Taylor' work provided a foundation for a French organizational theorist, Henri Fayol, also an engineer, to believe, as Hammer and Champy believe, that reengineering principles could be applied generally to most organizations.
When it comes to defining control, I prefer the definition that Henri Fayol developed.
Among those included are early theorists such as Henri Fayol, Frederick W.