Help-Wanted Index

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Help-Wanted Index

An index of the number of job advertisements in major American newspapers. This is used as an indicator of job openings and the general strength of the labor market. When the HWI is low, this means that few firms are hiring, which may result in increased unemployment. On the other hand, when the HWI is high, this means that many firms are hiring and potential employees have a great deal of choice regarding for whom they work. This may cause the firms to raise wages and salaries, which can (but does not always) have a negative impact on equities and bonds.
References in periodicals archive ?
NEW YORK, March 29 /PRNewswire/ -- The Conference Board Help-Wanted Advertising Index -- a key barometer of America's job market -- dipped one point in February.
0% THE CONFERENCE BOARD HELP-WANTED ADVERTISING INDEX Seasonally Adjusted Indexes, 1987=100 NOV.
NEW YORK, June 26 /PRNewswire/ -- The Conference Board Help-Wanted Advertising Index dipped one point in May.
The longest time series of vacancies that we have is the Help-Wanted Advertising Index (HWAI) provided by the Conference Board.
In an associated report, the Conference Board Help-Wanted Advertising Index dipped.
NEW YORK, May 29 /PRNewswire/ -- The Conference Board Help-Wanted Advertising Index was unchanged in April.
Based on graphs of the unemployment rate against the Conference Board's help-wanted advertising index (a rough proxy for vacancies), Economic Trends says:
NEW YORK, April 24 /PRNewswire/ -- The Conference Board Help-Wanted Advertising Index declined two points in March.
The Conference Board's Help-Wanted Advertising Index rose to 89 in January, up three points from December.
NEW YORK, April 4, 2008 /PRNewswire/ -- The Conference Board will no longer publish the Help-Wanted Advertising Index of print advertising after July 1, 2008.
The Conference Board's Help-Wanted Advertising Index dipped to 85 in November, from the prior month's reading of 86.