Helms-Burton Act

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Helms-Burton Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1996, that strengthened the existing trade embargo on Cuba. The U.S. had prohibited most trade with Cuba since 1960. The Act extended this prohibition to companies doing business with Cuba and to companies that use property Cuba had nationalized from American companies. The Act was quite controversial internationally.
References in periodicals archive ?
This event forced President Clinton into signing the Cuban exile-supported Helms-Burton Law.
26), through the passage of the Helms-Burton Law in 1996, which aimed at punishing TNCs and foreign corporations doing business in Cuba (p.
Under the Helms-Burton Law, US companies are prohibited from supplying services to Cuban individuals or companies.
The Helms-Burton Law (LIBERTAD Act of 1996, Public Law 104-14, 110 Stat.
And as recently as last year, Spanish Prime Minister Jose Maria Aznar, for example, made a point of staying at a Havana hotel run by a Spanish company, Sol Melia, which in the past has been threatened with action under the Helms-Burton law.
Another Reich organization, the US-Cuba Business Council, has received more than $520,000 in US Agency for International Development money for anti-Castro work supporting the goals of the Helms-Burton law.
Have we become such a threat that legislative redress, as mentioned by Brian Unger (the associate western executive director for the DGA), will be brought in, tantamount to the Helms-Burton Law (U.
In a volley aimed at the US, the declaration insisted that the US "end its application of the Helms-Burton law in conformity with resolutions approved by the United Nations General Assembly.
In fact, we discovered a case where a former head of the GATT -- Arthur Dunkel -- was appointed to judge the Helms-Burton law (related to the U.
The Helms-Burton law has stirred considerable international resentment, including a challenge in the World Court.
See No Joke: Canadian Lawmakers Pointedly Parody Helms-Burton Law, CHI.
In response, Castro made it illegal for Cubans to "collaborate with radio, television or other means of propaganda with the goal of facilitating the Helms-Burton law.