Helms-Burton Act


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Helms-Burton Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1996, that strengthened the existing trade embargo on Cuba. The U.S. had prohibited most trade with Cuba since 1960. The Act extended this prohibition to companies doing business with Cuba and to companies that use property Cuba had nationalized from American companies. The Act was quite controversial internationally.
References in periodicals archive ?
He also recalled that once Europe had a tough position against the US sanctions on Cuba imposed by the Helms-Burton Act of 1996, when the EU resorted to legal instruments to protect its business from the outcome of the restrictive measures.
Cuba Trade Act of 2017 would repeal the major statutes that codify sanctions against Cuba, including the Helms-Burton Act and the Cuban Democracy Act, as well as other provisions that impact trade, investment, and travel with Cuba.
The Helms-Burton Act of 1996 transformed the embargo into law, meaning that only Congress could end the economic and political sanctions.
Despite the thaw in relations, the embargo, officially known as the Helms-Burton Act, remains in place barring US tourists from visiting Cuba.
He is bound in part by the Helms-Burton Act, which requires congressional approval to remove the extra-territorial nature of trade prohibitions for nations who interact with Cuba.
Infectious curiosity has even crept into boardrooms of American and international companies who have been kept out of Cuba or resisted engagement because of the Helms-Burton Act.
Congress passed the Helms-Burton Act in 1996, tightening the embargo on Cuba, support for reinstating diplomatic relations dropped to 40%.
Only Congress has authority to lift the trade embargo provisions codified In legislation; for example, by making significant amendments to the Helms-Burton Act.
travelers, would not violate the Helms-Burton Act ban on trafficking, and "indirect financing," of confiscated property.
Specifically, the president cannot simply undo the 1996 Helms-Burton Act, which codified the U.
Instead, on its "Doing Business in Cuba" page, it simply advises British companies not to comply with Washington's Helms-Burton Act, and to avoid U.
CAFE reaffirmed its opposition to the Helms-Burton Act, something which it asserted coincides with the view of the majority of Cubans on the island and in the Diaspora, and championed the maintenance of cultural exchanges between the two nations.