Greeks

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Related to Hellenes: agora, Troy, Greeks, Greek people

Greeks

Mathematical measures of risk. See also: delta, gamma, rho, theta, and vega.
References in periodicals archive ?
In any case, if the result was to be final, the Spartans had to keep the pressure on, but the nature of their maximal political demand--that Athens liberate the Hellenes by dissolving its empire--was such that the Athenians could not accept it without committing strategic suicide.
Ancient Hellenes usually encountered these beliefs in myths of epic and tragedy.
Since everything in the realm of becoming is in flux, unstable, and contingent, particular names in particular languages are also thus: though Hellene and barbarian alike do their best, they still fall short of the ideal Form-names.
The letter was signed by the heads of the Hellenic American Leadership Council, the National Coordinated Effort of Hellenes, the American Hellenic Institute, UHAC National, AHEPA, PSEKA, Cyprus Federation of America, the Hellenic Federation of New Jersey and the American Hellenic Council.
Non-violent struggle Given the erasure and discrimination they face, the main goal of Greek pagans is the right to live and exist as Ethnikoi Hellenes.
Stylianides was in Washington to take part in the of the 29th Annual three-day Conference, hosted by the International Coordinating Committee "Justice for Cyprus" PSEKA and the Coordinated Effort of Hellenes (CEH).
As the first and longest-tenured President of the World Council of Hellenes Abroad, Athens was admired in Greece and throughout the Greek diaspora.
For Henry, warfare within Christendom had the character of a civil war; his description of its evils is reminiscent of what one might find in Thucydides, who viewed the Peloponnesian conflict as an internal war among fellow Hellenes.
Perhaps the most touching recognition is a scroll presented by a group calling itself The Common Committee of the Non-liberated Hellenes.
Pointing to the Christie's sale in 2007 of the collection of King George I of the Hellenes, Geoffrey Munn of Wartski, London, emphasises the lure and rarity of ancestral collections and royal provenance.
Dionysius the Areopagite and the Neoplatonist tradition; despoiling the Hellenes.
Here he turns his attention to a battle which may not quite have 'changed the world' but which did affect the future history of the Hellenes and of Europe in 480 BC (or what he prefers to call 'BCE' in a bid for spurious scholarship or to please US censors?