Point

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Related to Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point: HACCP

Point

The smallest unit of price change quoted, or one one-hundredth of a percent. Related: Minimum price fluctuation and tick.

Point

A way of conceptualizing price changes in the trading of securities. For stocks, a point corresponds to $1, while for bonds it indicates a 1% change relative to the face value. For example, if one states that GE rose two points on Thursday, this means that it rose $2. See also: Tick.

point

A change in the value of a security or a security index or average. For common and preferred stocks a point represents a change of $1. For bonds a point represents a 1% change in face value. For example, a one-point decline in a $1,000 principal amount bond translates to a $10 decline in price. For stock averages and indexes a point represents a unit of movement and is best interpreted as a percent of the beginning value. For example, a 100-point decline in the Dow Jones Industrial Average that started the day at 10,000 represents a 1% fall in the average.
References in periodicals archive ?
The standardized curriculum will set forth the minimum requirements for establishing a hazard analysis and critical control points, system, Kathy Knutson, food safety outreach manager for the research consortium of industry, academia, and FDA said.
Pathogen reduction has been the primary focus of numerous regulatory initiatives starting with the USDA's implementation of Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) in 1998.
The new system, whose worth is still unproven because it has never been used for any length of time on raw food, is called Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points, or Haccp (pronounced HAS-sip.
HFG Procurement is a Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) Systems accredited company and will also use the Ross ERP solution to provide end-to-end traceability of all ingredients received from suppliers all the way to finished goods sold to customers.