Hard Money


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Hard Money

A currency backed by a tangible commodity such as gold, silver, or platinum. Hard money has an intrinsic value, but is more susceptible to deflation than fiat money. Many countries used hard money throughout most of their histories; indeed, in the United States there was a significant debate in the late 19th century about whether the dollar should be based on gold or silver. However, most countries today use fiat money and have since the United States left the Bretton Woods System in the 1970s.
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Kennedy Funding, recognized as one of the largest and most successful hard money lenders in the country, has spent close to 20 years lending to those who do not find the banks a satisfactory source of funds, and particularly to those borrowers with a 'time is of the essence' issue.
For more information on Hard Money NYC, please visit them at www.
Chris Goulart is a seasoned professional and only works with California hard money loans.
We provide the flexibility to tailor loans for unique financial needs and deliver quick decisions because our commercial hard money loans are privately-issued, asset-based loans that are underwritten on the value of the real estate rather than on income or credit history.
Hard money sounds difficult to get, but it doesn't have to be.
Only Kazakhstan may pay for power in hard money," Nursultan Nazarbaev said.
The hard money of the people being collected from them through taxes was being lavishly spent on these polls, he added.
The Jeffersonian opponents of the central banking system, on the other hand, preferred "a hard money system based squarely on gold and silver, with banks shorn of all special privileges and hopefully confined to 100 percent specie banking.
The rate of return seemed excessive to the researchers, who admit it's unlikely the hard money contributions they studied represent the total cost to firms of political involvement.
At one of Jim Blanchard's giant hard money investor conferences in New Orleans, Lee told a group of publishers who were asking him if he was doing seminars or on the road speaking at investment conferences, "No, I like to sit in my office, write letters, and have people send me checks.
Despite the marked increase in hard money contributions and the BCRA ban on party soft money, soft money still found its way back into the political system mainly through "527" organizations, political committees organized under Section 527 of the Internal Revenue Code but not always regulated under federal election rules to limit the source and size of campaign contributions.
Under pressure for months to curb the soft money (contributions not regulated by federal election laws) spending of Section 527 political groups, the Federal Election Commission recently adopted a new rule requiring some groups to use federally regulated hard money to pay for at least 50 percent of their expenses, including salaries, rent, and other overhead.