Hard Commodity

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Hard Commodity

A commodity that is mined or obtained from some other non-agricultural source. Hard commodities include gold, oil and diamonds. See also: Soft commodity.
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We recognize concerns about the pace of growth of the world economy and its impact on falling prices of some hard commodities such as crude oil.
This follows significant pressures in the sector to reduce costs, as the price of hard commodities such as iron and copper continue to fall.
New wagons will be leased to medium-sized companies and used for transportation of different types of commodities such as consumer goods, hard commodities, construction materials, etc.
The PureFunds ISE Mining Service ETF is subject to risks associated with adverse market conditions, increased competition, environmental concerns, fluctuations in commodity prices and supply and demand of hard commodities, decreased metals demand and the success of exploration projects.
Sentiment surrounding Russia was weak at the beginning of the month due to lower oil prices and hard commodities.
Assets seen as safer such as German government bonds and the dollar recovered from lows, while stocks, the euro and hard commodities pared gains.
Prices for hard commodities held up, lending support to Russian equities (Brent slipped by insignificant 0.
This is the cheapest way to invest in the hard commodities story in Russia - oil, gas, minerals - but invest for the long term.
Banks and oil companies remain the two most valuable businesses on the list, while in 2011 mining increased its position from ninth to fifth on the back of rising demand for hard commodities such as gold and rare earths.
This stronger tendency in the currencies put pressure on all export concerns, be they vehicle manufacturers in South Africa, or mines exporting hard commodities, or Namibian fishing companies serving the European market.
soft and hard commodities as well as potential for f inancing capitalisation on development of roads, railways, energy generators and other infrastructure.
Oil's recent run above $100 a barrel has been largely attributed to a steadily depreciating US currency because a weakening dollar prompts investors to seek a safe haven in hard commodities such as oil and gold.