Hacker

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Related to Hackers: Computer hackers

Hacker

A person who infiltrates a computer system, usually in order to gather information. A hacker finds a way past the system's protocols. Some hackers do this simply for the thrill, though many others hack for nefarious purposes. For example, a hacker may be hired by a company or government to conduct espionage on a competitor or enemy. Other hackers freelance in order to find things like credit card numbers to facilitate identity theft and other crimes. However, the word is not always used in a negative context.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hackers are also tracking the server containing ISIS files, documents and data to make it public.
Chang said people must take actions to fight against hackers to stop further attacks.
The principal message by a hacker going by the handle, HEX786 read: "This is just a warning to all script kiddies Indians hackers.
Hobson said that the video serves as a stark reminder of what can happen if hackers gain access to systems they should not have control over.
Set your network to use Wired Equivalent Privacy or even stronger Wi-Fi Protected Access encryption, which encodes every transmission on the network, making it harder for hackers to "sniff" the data as it goes by.
Worm storms are particularly effective when hackers use a zero-day attack to spread the attack as there is no patch or signature to impede their propagation.
AIU Insurance Japan's HACKER SAFE Personal Information Theft Insurance covers up to 5,000,000 Yen (approx.
Brazil has become a haven for hackers because Brazil's cybercrime laws are so lax and because of Brazil's large organized crime base, one increasingly turning to cybercrime," says DK Matai, executive chairman at mi2g.
It's not the broadband connection that increases your risk, it's because you've extended the time you're online, and a hacker has more opportunity to get into your system, where he or she can access personal information stored on your computer and even steal your identity.
Verton does a good job of giving readers insight into what it is that makes teenage hackers do their thing.
The enemy they face includes an unknown legion of sophisticated hackers who may try to break into a company's system to steal data or disrupt service or to cause damage just because they can.
In Japan, hackers have recently succeeded in tampering with the Web sites of Sanyo Electric Co.