Hacker


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Hacker: Lifehacker

Hacker

A person who infiltrates a computer system, usually in order to gather information. A hacker finds a way past the system's protocols. Some hackers do this simply for the thrill, though many others hack for nefarious purposes. For example, a hacker may be hired by a company or government to conduct espionage on a competitor or enemy. Other hackers freelance in order to find things like credit card numbers to facilitate identity theft and other crimes. However, the word is not always used in a negative context.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hackers are trying to check and restrict such attempts," Chaudhary said.
I urge any company manager to view the Associated Press media report and reflect on what can happen if their IT security systems are not up to scratch, after all if this is what can be done to part of the critical national infrastructure which has significant defenses, imagine what damage could be done to the average business, with hackers immobilizing your production line or turning off the power supply to your building.
Hackers are continually honing their techniques and developing new attacks, so your staff needs to stay abreast of the latest security developments.
And since Brazil's prisons are so overcrowded, many hackers see no jail time at all as more serious offenders quickly fill up available prison space.
Mr Hacker qualified as a chemist from Brunel University and held various posts as a chemist, the last of which was with the Ministry of Defence.
Although this hook is a good read, it probably doesn't reveal enough about the minds of hackers for security practitioners to apply practical solutions.
Those savvy hackers who find flaws in the systems often share their knowledge by posting programs on the Internet, which can give even novices the key to break into a system at will.
The hacker wrote in a ''name'' which may be the hacker's own.
A Bush administration anti-terrorism proposal, which has elements that were included in the Uniting and Strengthening America by Promoting Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism (USA PATRIOT) Act of 2001, would affect computer hackers -- commonly referred to as "cyberterrorists" -- by prescribing punishment to anyone who "knowingly causes the transmission of a program, information, code, or command and, as a result of such conduct, intentionally causes damage without authorization" to an Internet-connected computer.
J-Fast, the pseudonymous author of the article, notes that "As a hacker, you are already treated poorly by the media.
Storage: the hacker finds a victim computer to store tools and programs that can be used to exploit other computers;
If the average hacker is a male between 16 and 25, why are most of the people arrested--and most of the ones you mentioned--in their 30s?