Gum Arabic


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Gum Arabic

A gum made from sap of the acacia tree. In the 19th century, it was a major export in parts of east Africa and Sudan. Gum arabic is used in painting and in textiles, as well as in some foodstuff and as a desert on its own.
References in periodicals archive ?
has expressed a desire to import the gum Arabic directly from Sudan to avoid delays in shipping and money transfers.
Higher preference to naturally-derived gum arabic in F&B industry
Gum Arabic (Acacia senega) (GA), family Fabaceae is a small deciduous Acacia tree from the genus Senegalia, known by the common names Rfaudraksha, Gum Acacia, Gum Arabic Tree, or Gum Senegal Tree.
The adsorption of BB3 onto Gum Arabic /PVA/Alginate from aqueous solutions was determined by UV-vis spectroscopy.
Three formulations of 'umbu-caja' pulp were elaborated and dried through the process of lyophilization using gum arabic (10, 20 and 30%).
This revealed the sap to be a "polysaccharide," a type of long-chain carbohydrate whose ratio of two primary sugars--arabinose and galactose--was intriguingly similar to that of gum Arabic.
Gum Arabic, also known as acacia gum, came to be known in ancient Egypt as early as 2000 BC as a non-timber forest product with usage in confectionery, pharmaceutical and beverage industries, mainly as additive.
The perky primates didn't want to come in to go to bed, but staff solved the problem by offering them their favourite treat - gum arabic, a gluey tree sap which the mini marmosets adore.
Inspired by the ancient trading of Oud along the incense route of antiquity, stretching from Mediterranean ports through Arabia to India and beyond, the tightly rolled black tea leaves of Oud Night Tea are scattered with gum Arabic.