Guinea

(redirected from Guineans)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Guinea

A gold coin issued in the United Kingdom between 1663 and 1816. From 1717 on, its value was fixed by law at 21 shillings, or just over one British pound. After it was withdrawn from circulation, "guinea" remained a slang term for 21 shillings. After decimalization, the term was still used in horse racing and the sale of rams to mean 1.05 pounds.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, the project aligns with the West African Power Pool (WAPP) programme that aims to provide electricity supply and facilitate cross-border power exchange, said senior officials at the official cornerstone-laying ceremony of Guinea's National Dispatch Centre held in the presence of Guinean President Alpha Conde and Prime Minister Mamady Youla.
If the upheaval brought about by War failed to result in an immediate change in policy following some ideational change, there is little doubt that the changes caused at least some Papua New Guineans who were caught up in the War to question their status and relationship with their erstwhile colonial masters.
While as a matter of government policy, the Government of Guinea does not encourage or facilitate illegal activity associated with drug trafficking, corruption is prevalent throughout all elements of the Guinean government.
The following brief, panoramic view of Equatorial Guinean literature shows that many writers revisit key places and spaces of the past and present (material and nonmaterial) to give sense to the fragmented collective memory of Equatorial Guineans.
Earlier evidence from the same team indicated that New Guineans and residents of neighboring Bougainville Island inherited 4 to 6 percent of their DNA from Denisovans.
According to Hawthorne, bonds formed in barracoons and on ships were the foundations upon which Upper Guineans in Maranhao and Para built communities.
In Chapter Seven, "Exiles Stay at Home," Ugarte interrogates the notion of "inner exile," suggesting that the repressive regime of Macias coupled with the dictatorial history of Spanish colonizers provided the impetus for an anticolonial literature to emerge among Equatorial Guineans who migrated as well as those who did not leave the country.
As the course of World War II placed increasing labour demands on Papua and New Guinea, the mass employment of Papua New Guineans became vital to the allied war effort.
Here they caused much greater destruction and dislocation, driving Guineans out of their homes along with as many as 75,000 Sierra Leonean refugees who had been living on the Guinean side of the border for several years.
We urge the Guinean government to exercise restraint and ensure the safety and security of Guineans and foreign nationals.
This paper explores the perceptions that young Papua New Guineans have about the world beyond their country's borders.
The UCLA professor of physiology and environmental health sciences - who is also an avid bird lover - was in Papua New Guinea 30 years ago when a native acquaintance challenged him: ``Why do you white men have so much cargo (possessions) and we New Guineans have so little?