Guild

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Guild

An association of persons with a particular skill or trade. For example, the electricians in an area may form a guild for mutual support, to route business to each other, or for other reasons. A guild contrasts with a union primarily because it includes both employers and employees; it is based on trade, rather than class. Guilds were most common in medieval Europe, but still exist and have a great deal of sway in some industries, notably filmmaking. Bar associations of lawyers and realtor groups may also be considered guilds.
References in periodicals archive ?
The aggregate number of identified members of the guild system of Jerusalem in any year of the period under review in this book is roughly 900.
Martin Agnew, managing director of the Henderson Group, has become chairman of Spar's National Guild--the ultimate authority within Spar's democratic guild system.
The period covered by Crowston begins with the incorporation of the Parisian seamstresses's guild in 1675 and ends with the permanent abolition of the guild system under the French Revolution in 1791.
Personal eccentricities blended with the strains of a world where the traditional guild system was changing to make the introduction of health measures problematic.
He attributes the growth of the guild system and the proliferation of sufi orders in Egypt to Ottoman rule and example (p.
In addition, the game features multiple class and race combinations, a robust trade skill system, and a comprehensive player Guild system.
Born in 1908 to a Jewish family that had been making soap since 1858, Emanuel Bronner was a third generation certified master-soapmaker under the guild system of the time.