Guild


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Guild

An association of persons with a particular skill or trade. For example, the electricians in an area may form a guild for mutual support, to route business to each other, or for other reasons. A guild contrasts with a union primarily because it includes both employers and employees; it is based on trade, rather than class. Guilds were most common in medieval Europe, but still exist and have a great deal of sway in some industries, notably filmmaking. Bar associations of lawyers and realtor groups may also be considered guilds.
References in periodicals archive ?
The guilds at Southern Ohio Medical Center share a common goal to support the needs of the patients, as well as the hospital s beneficial programs through fundraising efforts.
The guild is also very interested in attracting members from surrounding communities.
The need to defend guild monopolies against outsiders was particularly acute in the seventeenth century.
Institutions and European Trade: Merchant Guilds, 1000-1800
Even after the downfall of Napoleon and the crowning of Louis XVIII, the debate continued with new proponents of the guild system emerging after 1815.
In response to a proposal by New York Guild President Bill O'Meara, Times Senior Vice President of Operations and Labor Terry Hayes said the company would agree to offer a voluntary buyout," the memo stated, in part.
Boydston said the guild hopes eventually to start a regional theatre company and is in the planning stages for a larger facility.
According to Furman, "It's very exciting to be celebrating Guild Hall's 75th Anniversary and in honor we are making a change in the format this year that will enable us to recognize all 70 past honorees of the lifetime achievement awards who are so deserving and so talented".
Brendell's torment following the perfidiousness of his Guild is predictable, comprehensible and quite plausible.
Huddersfield Town Hall was the venue for the annual meeting of the West Yorkshire Federation of Towns- women's Guilds.
Though the actual production of clothing often involved complex female/female relationships--which Crowston highlights briefly in her conclusion as well as in many chapters--more of the conclusions Crowsron draws about the seamstresses guild involve male/female comparisons.