Growth Accounting


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Growth Accounting

The study and analysis of factors affecting economic growth. For example, growth accounting may measure things like productivity and growth of capital in order to account for changes to the gross domestic product of a country or region.
References in periodicals archive ?
We use a standard framework for growth accounting, as described in Fernald (2014) and Byrne et al.
Moreover, the econometric method produced consistent trends of TFP growth relative to those produced through growth accounting and index number methods.
Economic Analyses Using the Overlapping Generations Model and General Equilibrium Growth Accounting for the Japanese Economy: Population, Agriculture and Economic Development
At The Conference Board, we produce annual projections of key economic variables including output for 55 economies based on a growth accounting model.
The general economic performance of the countries are assessed for the period under question; economic development is considered in relation to key indicators, including gross domestic product, private consumption, government consumption, fixed investment, exports, and imports; and a growth accounting method is used in order to identify the sources of growth in relation to capital and labor inputs and total factor productivity growth.
Despite this, the sector remains the largest contributor to credit growth accounting alone for 29 per cent of total credit and about half of all credit gains year-to-date.
Despite this, the sector remains the largest contributor to credit growth accounting alone for 29% of total credit and about half of all credit gains year-to-date.
Hence, we introduced and tested an alternative growth accounting method to factorize the components of output based on a production function approach.
Motorcycles grew by 13 percent growth accounting for sales of 71,462 units in February 2011 as against 63,394 units in February 2010.
The authors use a growth accounting framework to examine growth of the rapidly developing Chinese economy.
Kliesen uses a standard growth accounting framework to estimate how gross domestic product (GDP) growth can be expected to change as the baby-boom generation--born between 1946 and 1964--heads towards retirement.
First we provide an overview of the growth accounting methodology underlying the analysis (section 2).