Greed


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Greed

The intense, perhaps inordinate, desire for wealth. There is no consensus as to how much desire qualifies as greed. Some believe greed to be positive as it motivates business, which spurs economic growth. Many others, however, believe greed can go too far and create unsustainable growth or growth at the expense of social justice. The morality of greed is a concern in the field of business ethics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Investors have been severely shaken by each revelation of corporate greed.
Finally, the apparent importance of greed rather than ideology has implications for all studies of human nature.
Mr Newnes, author of a new book called This is Madness Too, which is a critical account of the psychiatric system, says greed and envy are actually two different things.
Researcher Sarah Brosnan says that monkeys tested without partners displayed greed for grapes but grew more likely to exchange their tokens for cucumbers by the end of their sessions.
The Medicare drug program was written by drug companies to put corporate greed before seniors' needs.
Words of Wisdom discusses such topics as the potential of all living things to become Buddhas, warnings against the three poisons of greed, anger, and sexual misconduct, the Six Guidelines of no fighting, no greed, no seeking, no selfishness, no pursuit of personal advantage, and no lying, and much more.
Belize) argues that greed can be seen as "a force that motivates an individual towards a change she or he considers an improvement, and possibly ones that open new opportunities to others.
I believe corporate greed would not be sustained without consumer greed.
This challenges me to look at the greed operating in my own life.
It must be stopped, and in fact reversed, if we are to have a benevolent future that is less greed oriented, with minimum unrest and without inevitable social and military revolution.