Great Society


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Great Society

A series of programs launched by U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson in the 1960s to improve quality of life for Americans. The Great Society saw a number of innovative programs. Some were more successful than others. Medicare and Medicaid, which greatly reduce medical expenses for the elderly and the poor, proved popular though expensive. Food stamps were intended to improve food security, though critics maintain that they encourage recipients to eat unhealthily. The Great Society also increased federal funding for universities and created the National Endowment for the Arts.
References in periodicals archive ?
For every adult man ages 20 to 64 who is between jobs and looking for work, more than three are neither working nor seeking work, a trend that began with the Great Society.
Narrator B: Johnson wants to focus on Great Society programs, but the conflict in Vietnam also demands his attention.
As LBJ would learn during his tumultuous years in office, hopes for a Great Society, a nation committed to social justice, devoid of poverty, and sensitive to the needs of the most marginalized Americans, proved naive.
Not only did he have the grief of a nation mourning the loss of their first handsome president on his shoulders, but his Great Society, a program seeking to advance social causes, racial equality, and a full-fledged war on poverty, was hopelessly sidelined by a minor disturbance in Southeast Asia that ballooned into the most divisive event in 20th century US history.
It was the nonviolent demonstrations of African American leaders against civil rights violations that prompted Congress to enact Great Society solutions to ensure equal access and equal employment opportunities.
What we got to start doing is celebrating the fact that Britain has become a great society because it has always been a melting pot for people of different races and religions," he said.
While often viewed as a great prognosticator, Moynihan long ago recognized that the failure of social policy occurred well before the Great Society.
We've come a long way in 30 years, from a president promising a Great Society to people saying to government, 'don't do any more damage.
It developed and grew, witht eh vision of Mary Switzer, and the impact of historical forces such as the New Deal and the Great Society.
Admittedly, the march of rights and freedoms associated with the New Deal and Great Society has always been unsteady in domestic affairs (Klinkner and Smith 1999), buffeted by hostility toward federal governmental power, jealousy of "states' rights," and the desire of some citizens to protect economic and racial advantages (e.
Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) with the goal of shutting down much of Lyndon Johnson's Great Society programs.
He addresses four major points: why poverty persists in spite of programs like the New Deal and Great Society, race and gender among the extreme poor, the connection between poverty and riches, and the need for civic action as well as policy action.

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