Gradus


Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Wikipedia.

Gradus

An ancient Roman unit of length approximately equivalent to 740 millimeters. It was also called a pes sestertius.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bach's library as souvenirs, as for example Fux, Gradus ad Parnassum (1724).
This finding is promising given the supposition of some (APA, 2013; Gradus et al.
Also featured in the cast are Patrick Carfizzi as Schaunard, Oren Gradus as Colline, and Donald Maxwell as Benoit/Alcindoro.
Besides their origin, another common denominator of the three musicians is their being pupils in Vienna of the Imperial Kapellmeister Johann Joseph Fux, one of the greatest musical authorities of the 18th century, whose work Gradus ad Parnassum was widely used as a textbook of composition and counterpoint for many decades.
Mac Kenzie WR, Hoxie NJ, Proctor ME, Gradus MS, Blair KA, Peterson DE, et al.
His enim hoc accidit, qui vel voluptate aliqua compediti carcerem suum amant, vel vulgi commercio et vulgari negotio victum querunt, vel ad lubricos honorum gradus populorum ventosis suffragiis aspirant, et quibus (que ingens his temporibus turba est) litere non animi lux atque oblectatio vite sunt, sed instrumenta divitiarum" (Petrarca, De vita solitaria 330).
In the standard theoretical environmental literature, Gradus and Smulders (1993), van Ewijk and van Wijnbergen (1995) and Pautrel (2008, 2009), among others, have demonstrated how the negative impact of pollution on learning abilities of individuals can be transmitted to economic growth and shown that a better environmental quality and a higher long-term level of growth are mutually compatible.
For example, "Docto Gradus ad Parnassum" from Children's Corner paints a picture of Debussy's daughter practicing her Clementi technical exercises at the piano.
Benedict's Ascending Steps of Humility and Bernard's Descending Steps of Pride Duodecim Gradus Humilitatis Superbiae Gradus in Descendendo 12.
This dynamic has created more opportunities for gender-specific deployment stressors, in particular sexual harassment and sexual assault, collectively referred to as military sexual trauma (MST) (for example, Gradus, Street, Kelly, & Stafford, 2008), as discussed below.
In a stratified, large-scale sample of military reservists, Gradus and colleagues (2008) examined whether symptoms of depression explained the relationship between military sexual harassment experiences and alcohol misuse, and they found that more severe sexual harassment was related to greater depression symptoms among female reservists.
From Saunders and Otley, to Effingham Wilson, to Longmans, to Moxon became Browning's professional gradus ad parnassum.