Gradient

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Gradient

The slope,or change in elevation,of land or improvements such as a pipe or a road.It is expressed as the ratio of inches (or feet) of rise or fall over a specified distance. It is similar to the concept of pitch in roofing.Figure A (above) has a gradient of 1:12 because the grade increases by 1 foot over a distance of 12 feet. Figure B has a gradient of 1:6.

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The optimization is finally carri ed out by maximal matching the gradient distribution of estimate to that of a prior face image.
Mean percentage of sperm motility in post-preparation of density gradient procedure was 83.
Pairing two gradients will create fascinating stripes that play off of each other.
It might be less than a mile, but make no mistake - this is the one of the toughest climbs in South Wales, with the gradient hovering around 15% virtually all the way until it finally shows mercy in the last 200m.
In vehicle dynamics modelling, the road profile is generally treated in one of two ways; either the gradient is a property that changes over a length scale far greater than that of the vehicle's wheelbase, or as a very detailed road surface model for determining the behaviour of vehicle suspensions.
the means of the gradients were compared against a criterion value of 4, the numerical value assigned to S+).
A high flow rate allows running short gradients with relatively shallow gradient slopes; the shallow slope is required to preserve selectivity between charge variants.
Gradients are often due to unwanted light sources such as light pollution, but there are many natural light sources that will introduce gradients to your deep-sky images, including the zodiacal light, aurorae, and even natural airglow.
Many tissues form during development and healing processes at least in part due to gradients of signals; gradients of growth factors, gradients of physical triggers.
Abstract In this study, gradient acrylate latex particles were synthesized by gradient copolymerization.
Alternative views have suggested physical features are not necessarily the result of a specified number of proteins, but, rather, come from more complex interactions between multiple gradients that work against one another.