Governor

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Governor

1. The head of a bank, especially but not necessarily a central bank. For example, the highest post in the Bank of England is called the Governor.

2. More generally, a term for some chief executives, especially heads of political subdivisions. For example, the head of an American state is called a governor.
References in periodicals archive ?
The generall historie of Virginia, New-England and the Summer Isles: with the names of the adventurers, planters, and governours from their first beginning in 1584 to this present 1624.
begin strikethrough]Thirdly[end strikethrough] B3 (c) a Case] Case B2 | case B3 (d) to] <to> (e) and] or B2, B3 (f) Soveraigne] B1, B3 | Governour B2 (g) active] actively B2, B3 (h) except'd,] B1, B2 | [begin strikethrough]ac[end strikethrough]<ex>cepted, B3 (i) Societys,] em.
A Critical Edition of Sir Thomas Elyot's The Boke Named the Governour.
The title of this slender book does not indicate that it focuses narrowly on the social aspects of the Horatian conjunction of pleasure and profit in Elyot's Boke Named the Governour, Sidney's Defence of Poetry, and the second book of Spenser's The Faerie Queene.
Elyot, The Boke named the Governour, writes, "How shall he [the child] abhorre tyranny, fraude and avarice, whan he doth se the paynes of Duke Theseus, Prometheus, Sisiphus and such othere tourmented for their dissolute and vicious lyvying" (1:65).
In the Governour, Elyot prefaces his recommendation of individual sports by remarking,
Warner reconsiders several examples of Tudor literature, including Sir Thomas More's Utopia, Sir Thomas Elyot's The Boke Named the Governour, and Christopher Saint German's The dialoges in Englishe, betweene a doctor of diuinitie, and a student in the lawes of Englande, for their propaganda value as either direct expressions of the King's self-fashioning or manifestations of the kind of criticism the King invited.
This distinction was frequently and variously expressed, as for example by Sir Thomas Elyot in the Boke Named the Governour, 1531: "A man in his naturall perfection is fiers / hardy / strong in opinion / covaitous of glorie / desirous of knowledge / appetiting by generation to bring forth his semblable.
In William Barlow's account of the proceedings, James "stirred" at the suggestion, seeing in it a direct challenge to his authority as "Supreme Governour in all causes, and over all persons, (as well Ecclesiasticall as Civill).