Goldilocks economy


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Goldilocks economy

A term developed in the mid 1990s to describe the positive performance of the economy as "not too hot, not too cold; just right."

Goldilocks Economy

An economy that is performing well enough to avoid a recession and even provide a solid return for investors, but not so well that it causes inflation. The term references the story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears because the economy is neither too cold nor too hot.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result, the return of a Goldilocks economy seems like a most unlikely scenario.
If the Goldilocks Economy is getting a tad overheated, the Fed withdraws money and raises short-term interest rates.
Kyser says the region enjoys a Goldilocks economy at this point -- not too hot and not too cold.
The Goldilocks economy of the past six months - not too hot, not too cold - bolstered the bottom lines of most investors, a scenario that was less than certain a year ago when the prospect of high gas prices, natural disasters and rising interest rates prompted many to suggest 2006 might mark the end of the bull market.
A mix of political and economic factors is combining to create a goldilocks economy that's moving neither too fast nor too slow, with moderating interest rates, record low default rates, and lots of liquidity.
It is, indeed, a Goldilocks economy "not too hot, not too cold, just right.
A lot of the questionnaires were filled out at a time when there was talk of a Goldilocks economy (not too fast, but not too slow.
Nor will it be a Goldilocks economy, a term Shulman coined in the early 1990s to describe one that is neither too hot nor too cold.
Thus ended the Goldilocks Economy, the longest economic expansion in our nation's history.
A goldilocks economy is one where there is enough growth to sustain corporate profits and keep unemployment levels low, but not so low that it sparks inflation.
The market perceives we are in a perfect environment, with a Goldilocks economy and Goldilocks politics,'' said David Shulman, the chief equity strategist at Salomon Brothers, with the economic and political porridge neither too hot nor too cold.
For now, the Goldilocks economy lives, as does The Bull.