Gold Coin

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Gold Coin

1. A coin of gold bullion that may be bought and sold for investment. Most gold bullion is at least 99.9% pure. Gold coins, like all gold bullion, are commodities that investors often use as a hedge against recession and inflation. Thus, while they are volatile like most commodities, they always maintain a relatively high value. Gold coins are measured by mass and purity rather than face value.

2. A coin of a currency that is minted from gold and intended for circulation. See also: Kruggerand.
References in periodicals archive ?
continental Celtic gold coinage imitated the Macedonian king (and Alexander's father) Phillip II's coinage.
Nonetheless, Roosevelt proceeded to promote an exceedingly unsound currency--with the seizure of most Americans' gold, devaluation of gold coinage, removal of domestic redemption of Federal Reserve Notes in gold, and the nullification of gold clauses in both public and private contracts (Vieira 2002: 867-1235).
Its primary functions of refining gold from the eastern goldfields and striking gold coinage continue to this day with gold now refined at The Perth Mint Refinery, near Perth Airport and precious metal coins struck onsite at the Mint.
Overall, Iron Age gold coinage is unusually common in hoards when compared with later Roman period hoard compositions, for example (Bland & Loriot 2010: 28-29).
Her elevation to gold coinage came in 1987 and still today she adorns the high value coins of the realm.
Topics of the papers include such topics as the devaluation of Sidonian silver coinage in 365 BCE and the first bronze issues, the Stymphalos Hoard of 1999 and the city's defenses, the gold coinage of Trajan dated COS V, Trajan's gold coinage from 112-117 CE, the enigma of 'Abud al-Dawla Kuch Tegin resolved, the possibility that Athangild's name appears in the Visigoth's coinage, the and Liberty Reverse type of the Connecticut coppers.
Gold coinage was minted again in Europe in the 13th century.
Furthermore, the purification of gold coinage had something in common with the state's "freezing" of monetary circulation, since it ensured in another way that its transformation into money left the value of gold unchanged.
The act transferred title of gold from the Federal Reserve to the United States government, prohibited gold coinage, and banned gold from circulation.
According to Hancock, "In my thirty-plus years of specializing in southern gold coinage, I have never been able to handle so many outstanding coins.