Goal

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Related to Goals: personal goals

Goal

An individual's or institution's financial objective.

Goal

What a person or institution seeks to gain from an investment. Goals vary from investor to investor and can even change for the same investor over time. For example, a person may have the goal to extract a high return from her investments when she is young in order to finance a certain lifestyle; this person is likely to invest in high risk securities and ventures. Over time, however, this person may be concerned about protecting savings for retirement. As a result, the goals may shift and the person may invest primarily in bonds and blue-chip stocks instead. Goals influence one's investment philosophy and strategy. See also: Portfolio Restructuring.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ali Ahmad Tiwan hit three goals and one goal was the effort of Ahmad Nawaz Tiwana for the winner.
But just because I can't get images of this classic out of my head, it doesn't necessarily mean goals will be on the menu at the Lane again today.
Hill's three goals give her seven in the past two games for the No.
Some research supports metacognitive theory, suggesting that students are better equipped than parents or teachers to set realistic goals for themselves (Hannafin, 1981; Palmer & Wehmeyer, 2003; Tuinstra & Hiatt-Michael, 2004).
Again, a turnover of the ball will produce a productive counter-attack near the goal.
The academic VP who more clearly identifies with her faculty will seldom view team goals as more important than her own.
If the patient's desired goals or results are not clinically achievable or the costs are unacceptable to the patient, the physician must then determine what alternative goals and results are achievable and the human and economic costs of these.
Executives who set goals just to meet short-term EPS expectations typically assume that strong capital market performance is the result of delivering what the market wants.
Ball and Ball (2000) cite that campers from ages fourteen to seventeen prefer to set their own goals, create and keep commitments, and desire adult roles.
In addition to being SMART, your goals should have the power of the three P's.
A performance management system is designed so that goals are aligned with your organization's strategy and annual objectives.
Pathways thoughts reflect a person's perceived capacity to produce cognitive routes to desired goals (Snyder, 1994).