Glasnost


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Glasnost

A policy to increase the transparency of the government of the Soviet Union. Glasnost was instituted in the late 1980s, relaxing censorship of the media and permitting greater freedom of speech. It made public many of the atrocities committed under Joseph Stalin and the dilapidation of many aspects of Soviet life. Some historians see this loosening of state policy as one of the causes of the fall of the Soviet Union. See also: Perestroika.
References in periodicals archive ?
Glasnost Festival returns for its fourth year in 2015, and the organisers are expecting it to be the biggest and best yet.
However, the main point here is this: Glasnost was in fact a media experiment in the Soviet Union.
Every "engagement" -- detente, glasnost, perestroika -- ended with the Communist regimes gobbling up more Free World real estate, and the spawning of more Soviet subcontractor regimes that Moscow could have do its dirty work, while denying any knowledge or complicity.
Dedicating a considerable space to Soviet popular print culture before the reading boom, the author underscores the gains of glasnost and the role of the intelligentsia in bringing about the "perestroika of reading" (p.
Russian academic Alexander Yakovlev, the brain behind glasnost and perestroika (restructuring) in the last years of the dissolved Soviet Union, will arrive in Taipei on Saturday for a weeklong visit, the Taiwan Foreign Ministry said Friday.
But if the success of Philadelphia led to The Birdcage and both in turn helped bring about the new gay glasnost in Hollywood, Brooks still believes there are limits on the studios' open minds--and open checkbooks.
By June 1990, when the new Law on the freedom of the Press was approved, and in August, when official censorship was cnded, it became clear: glasnost meant freedom of the press.
Their stories naturally reflect the vagaries of memory, the official de-stalinization and revival of religion acceptable in the glasnost years, and possibly the self-selection of interviewees.
Russian Critics on the Cinema of Glasnost is an important collection of significant articles from the Russian cinema press over the last decade.
With the official institution of glasnost, he was allowed to publish Deti Arbata (1987; Children of the Arbat), much of which had been suppressed for over two decades.