Glasnost


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Glasnost

A policy to increase the transparency of the government of the Soviet Union. Glasnost was instituted in the late 1980s, relaxing censorship of the media and permitting greater freedom of speech. It made public many of the atrocities committed under Joseph Stalin and the dilapidation of many aspects of Soviet life. Some historians see this loosening of state policy as one of the causes of the fall of the Soviet Union. See also: Perestroika.
References in periodicals archive ?
With more than 20 acts performing at the venues, ranging from bands and musicians, to poets, dancers, performers, comedy, live art, and a whole range of other surprises, the team behind Glasnost Festival aim to transform the two innercity Cardiff venues into a festival paradise.
The Full Moon and The Moon Club will be hosting The Glasnost Festival
Iran's progressive forces have not abandoned their struggle for democracy and human rights and the flames of their own glasnost now encircle a regime that has reached a dead end.
Other noteworthy review essays include "Some Perspectives on Soviet Cinema in the Glasnost Era," "Requiem for Soviet Cinema, 1917-1991," and "Buttons, Buttons, Who's Got the Workers?
He introduced elements of democracy, including glasnost (openness)
His policy of glasnost (openness) was aimed at reducing corruption, and allowed for transparency and freedom of information where it was previously suppressed.
One example was the experience of Aleksandr Yakovlev, who is best known as the godfather of glasnost, Gorbachev's policy of promoting openness in Soviet society.
COVENTRY BEES are to do their bit for glasnost by recruiting a Russian rider for the first time in their history.
When we saw Gorbachev come along with glasnost and perestroika and we watched the end of the Soviet Union.
When he was the leader of the Soviet Union from 1985 until its demise in 1991, he introduced the ideas of glasnost (transparency and openness) and perestroika (the restructuring of the Soviet society and economy), concepts that brought about historic changes in his country.
Laibach was revered by Russian rock musicians during the mid-'80s glasnost period; the Slovenian band's culture-jamming strategies weren't necessarily well understood, but they were proof that success in the capitalist world was possible.