ghetto

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ghetto

A term with its origins in eastern Europe, used to designate the part of town occupied by Jewish citizens. Now the term ghetto is used to describe any urban area suffering significant deterioration, often predominated by one or a very few ethnic or racial groups. Disputes often arise regarding whether lenders, insurers, and other service providers are engaged in illegal discrimination when they redline these neighborhoods, or whether they are assessing risks based on the quality of the infrastructure and not on any judgments regarding the inhabitants.
References in periodicals archive ?
Getto, Vita di forme e forme di vita nel Decameron, Torino: Petrini, 1966, 68; G.
Getto lo considero tra i piu importanti tragediografi minori dell'eta della Controriforma.
Getto spent a few days in New Orleans, in a house with someone she had never met before.
For more information, phone Kim Getto at (707) 963-3388.
Since our last convention, we've added over 75 new stores, including our new partnership with CarpetMAX Canada," said Barth Getto, vice president of member relations.
3) Italian scholars have been able to build upon the foundations laud by Levasti, Getto, Petrocchi, and Battaglia, and the study of exempla has also enriched the pursuits of art historians, most notably in the examination of the frescoes in the Camposanto in Pisa, which portry the Thebaid fathers and the Triumph of Death.
Attorney Ernest Getto, who represented Navegar, expressed heartfelt sympathy for the survivors, but insisted that "to hold the manufacturer of lawfully-made and lawfully-sold firearms responsible for it [Fern's rampage] would be wrong.
Getto, who resigned after one season with the Playhouse as part of its new all-female management.
This court went farther than 18 other appellate courts did," said attorney Ernest Getto of Los Angeles, who represents Navegar, Inc.
Bonino said it was a package of measures the European Commission had proposed that had allowed Britain to getto grips with the crises and that was why the number of cases of mad cow in Britain had fallen by 96 percent since 1992.