Nationalism

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Nationalism

The philosophy in which one promotes the interests of one's own country or ethnic group over others. For example, nationalism may advocate secession of a region to form a new country in which one's own ethnic group predominates. What qualifies as a "nation" in nationalist terms is a matter of some disagreement.
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47) If German nationalists asserted the Jew's radical alterity in the interest of German-Jewish disengagement, Buber sought to affirm the Jews' nondescript yet supposedly concrete otherness in order to promote an integrationist agenda that aimed to reincorporate the Jews within the family of nations.
Even after the war and the successful establishment of the German Empire, German Protestant pastors and German nationalists spoke of the need for a final victory of Germany over France.
Patterns of anger resurfaced in what Bloch described as the "irratio" of ressentiment and xenophobia expressed by German nationalists.
Here, wearing once again the mask of the 'political sociologist', Pessoa analyses the nature of German nationalism, stressing its defensive geopolitical foundation, in a line of thought that is fully consonant with the theories of Germany's besieged position in Central Europe and of the German Sonderweg typical of German nationalist discourse.
These ideas were evolved by Austrian German nationalists in the final phase of the Habsburg empire.
German nationalist Friedrich Ludwig Jahn began to popularize gymnastics--"turning"--as a way to increase his fellow citizens' patriotism and fitness.
After the revolutionary armies occupied the Rhineland he turned against the foreign conqueror, though without explicitly becoming - as other former Jacobins, like Johann Gottlieb Fichte, did - a German nationalist.
Al-Imam was trained as a dentist in Germany where he grew to admire, and in certain ways identify with, the German nationalist ideal.
At least parts of the Workers' Abstainers League agreed with the German Nationalist temperance forces that eugenic thoughts were the basis of anti-alcohol efforts.
Among other things Kaufmann demonstrated conclusively that Nietzsche was no narrow German nationalist or fanatical anti-Semite.
Chapter two charts the critique and adaptation of Goethe's programmatic statements from Heine's Wintermarchen to the spectrum of contemporary German nationalist voices.
On 5 December 1917, six members of the German nationalist faction in the Austrian parliament (Reichsrat) handed the Imperial and Royal [kaiserliche und konigliche or k.

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