Grosz

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Related to George Grosz: Otto Dix, Neue Sachlichkeit

Grosz

A division of the Polish zloty equal in value to 1/100 of one zloty. The plural of grosz is groszy.
References in periodicals archive ?
There, key pictures by Otto Dix, George Grosz and Lasar Segall were vilified.
The start of the fair season in London sees a number of galleries mounting important exhibitions, notably Richard Nagy's timely retrospective of George Grosz.
Conor's work is influenced by late 18th/early 19th Century Spanish painter Francisco de Goya, and German 20th Century social-political artists Kathe Kollwitz and George Grosz.
If ``Exiles and Emigres'' scrupulously avoids treating any artist as a hero, it can't resist casting one, George Grosz, as its chief tragic figure.
Even the works this installation seems to me closest to, the harshly satiric Dada drawings and prints of Otto Dix and George Grosz from the late 1910s and '20s, get their ferocity from the tightness of their focus, a quality this piece forgoes through accumulative sprawl.
And thinking about the highly unofficial war art of, say, George Grosz or Otto Dix, you could see his point.
Gehry, the show features works by Marcel Breuer, Marc Chagall, Max Ernst, George Grosz, Wassily Kandinsky, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Kurt Schwitters and many more.
And nowhere is there the kind of savage fury on the part of the Italian artists that typified the 'degenerative' art of the German Otto Dix (1891-1969) with Dedicated to Sadists (1922), here shown alongside the bloody After the Questioning (1935) by George Grosz (1893-1959).
She can summon companions as unlikely as Florine Stettheimer and Yves Tanguy, or George Grosz and Elizabeth Peyton, in a single picture.
But we have to remember that modern artists also illustrated books, and so we have to include Picasso, Fernande Leger, Joan Miro, Matisse, Henry Moore and the Berlin artist George Grosz.
Thompson and has been installed in the same pantheon as Max Beerbohm, George Grosz and Ronald Searle.
Untitled (Smoke), for instance, channels Otto Dix and George Grosz, its smoke-filled festivities pervaded by a sense of impending doom, and evokes collage through the use of paint alone.