Generational Accounting

Generational Accounting

A way to conduct accounting that primarily considers how current income and spending will impact long-term financial sustainability. The term is used most frequently in government accounting. For example, generational accounting may consider whether or not the state pension can pay all liabilities for at least 60 years.
References in periodicals archive ?
It will do so by incorporating fiscal gap and generational accounting analysis in the budget process.
The advantage of generational accounting methodology is the relative ease in computing the tax burden since no specific assumptions about individual preferences, technology, and market structure are required.
Most of these exercises in generational accounting have been framed by an explicit concern with long-term fiscal sustainability (Ablett 1996; Ablett 1998; Larch & Noguei-Gokhale 2009; Ballassone et.
Demography and social health insurance; an international comparison using generational accounting.
To predict the national savings rate for Korea over the next several decades, he uses a life-cycle model that incorporates the generational accounting approach needed to assess the distribution of fiscal burden across generations.
A technique, known as Generational Accounting, has used 1991 and 1995 base line data to measure intergenerational balance (Ablett 1996; 1999).
This method is known as generational accounting (Auerbach, Gokhale and Kotlikoff, 1994).
In recent years, the concept of generational accounting has emerged as yet another approach to assessing fiscal policy.
3) Generational Accounting The economic differences between older and younger Canadians are most obvious if we consider the results of "generational accounting.
Professor Kotlikoff publishes extensively in newspapers, and magazines on issues of deficits, generational accounting, the tax structure, social security, Medicare, health reform, pensions, saving, insurance, and personal finance.
The INFORM Act would require the Congressional Budget Office, Government Accountability Office and Office of Management and Budget to incorporate fiscal gap and generational accounting analysis in the budgeting and legislative process.
Since general equilibrium considerations play a potentially critical role in assessing policy sustainability and the likelihood of national bankruptcy, one would expect governments to be hard at work developing such models or, at a minimum, doing generational accounting to see the potential burden facing current young and future generations.