Millennial

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Related to Generation Y: Generation Z

Millennial

A member of the generation that was born roughly between 1980 and 2000. Millennials grew up during economic and political flux, experiencing the end of the Cold War, the dotcom bubble, the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the late 2000s recession. Perhaps because of the sometimes volatile environment in which they were raised, millennials tend to marry and undergo other rites of passage later than earlier generations. They also tend to be technically savvy, which makes them a major demographic for technology marketers.
References in periodicals archive ?
The percentage of members of generation Y who said they are extremely/very familiar with life insurance jumped from 31 percent to 44 percent.
Generation Y members have career paths in mind that will allow them to do work they feel is meaningful.
Like any other group, health issues will become more of a concern as Generation X and Generation Y age, as will stress management.
Teenage Research Unlimited estimated that Generation Y teenagers spent $153 billion in 1999, 8.
When it came to career development, most of our generation Y respondents told us they thought that the responsibility should be shared equally between themselves and their employer.
Solheim, Shelley, "Seven Strategies for Recruiting Generation Y Workers," CRN, June 21, 2007.
Smither has been very impressed with the Generation Y members they've hired, "They seem to be independent but know how to work in groups, know what they want and have a plan to get there.
Networking the Generation Y way: A discussion paper on the interconnectivity between the traditional hospitality industry and the emerging Gen Y workforce.
Known for their optimism, education, collaborative ability, open-mindedness, and drive, Generation Y are the hottest commodities on the job market.
I never thought my job would involve me thinking about Generation Y 24 hours a day--whether as staff or as residents--but it has," said Baby Boomer Julie Smith, Vice President, Bozzuto Group, Greenbelt, Md.
Rsearchers, supervisors, and human resource professionals have long struggled with perfecting management strategies for employees, made more difficult by the presence of distinct personalities of the three most prevalent working generations, namely the Baby Boomers (born between the years 1946 and 1964), Generation X (born between 1965 and 1979), and Generation Y (born between 1980 and 2000).