Millennial

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Related to Generation Y: Generation Z

Millennial

A member of the generation that was born roughly between 1980 and 2000. Millennials grew up during economic and political flux, experiencing the end of the Cold War, the dotcom bubble, the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the late 2000s recession. Perhaps because of the sometimes volatile environment in which they were raised, millennials tend to marry and undergo other rites of passage later than earlier generations. They also tend to be technically savvy, which makes them a major demographic for technology marketers.
References in periodicals archive ?
The experts also suggested that the learning schema indicate the priorities among the proposed components, with a simpler framework for the Thai people to better reflect the way to reach Generation Y, considering their self-learning behavior that could be a barrier to classroom learning (K.
More recently, due to household financial stress caused by the global financial crisis, significant numbers of nurses re-entered the workforce and existing nurses increased their hours, resulting in a significant number of Generation Y nurses entering the workforce during a period of workforce surplus; subsequently a large number received only part-time work.
Although the results of this study are not generalizable, it may help leaders decide how to tailor change management strategies for Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y.
Generation Y (Gen Y) individuals are graduating from college and entering the labor pool as a large and influential group.
Based on ING's research efforts into the habits of Gen Y and our experiences working with successful life insurance agencies across the nation, here are a few ideas to help you more effectively engage and serve Generation Y clients--and tap into the largest market opportunity of the coming decades.
Does Generation Y assign different levels of importance to the five motivational factors than Generation X and Baby Boomers?
The three most prevalent working generations currently are Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y.
Despite the volume and passion of the Generation Y literature, there is limited formal evidence that Generation Y actually exist as a unique and distinct group with distinctly different employment attitudes.
This article aims to explore the linkage between emerging knowledge of Generation Y and the notion of employee engagement, drawing on an empirical investigation of the career expectations and aspirations of Generation Y undergraduate students who are experienced in hospitality and tourism work.
The site was developed to introduce the technologically savvy Generation Y candidate to the firm in a lively and entertaining way.
With the entry of Generation Y to the working world, the workforce for the first time contains four generations: Traditionalists (also called Veterans, Silents, or Greatest Generation; 75 million born before 1945; 10% of the workforce), Baby Boomers (80 million born 1945-1964, 45% of the workforce), Generation X (46 million born 1965-1980, 30% of the workforce), and Generation Y also called Echo Boomers, Millenials, Internet Generation, or Nexters; 76 million born after 1980; 15% of the workforce) (Paul, 2004; Francis-Smith, 2004; Johns, 2003; Martin and Tulgan, 2004; Raines, 2002).
While Generation Y will wield a great deal of power, in part due to its sheer size, organizations must still be careful to retain and motivate their older employees.