Gang


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Gang: Gant, Gangsta, Jang

Gang

An organized group (often rather small) of persons with a common identity. The term is usually used to describe organized crime groups, especially those run by racial and ethnic minorities. As with most organized crime groups, gangs have symbols, rituals and are generally involved in drug trafficking and other illegal activities. Gangs and other organized crime groups pose a significant and persistent problem for law enforcement. See also: RICO.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
In every direction he heard some one or other of the gang hemming him in.
As to the gang, it will be within the memory of the public how completely the evidence which Holmes had accumulated exposed their organization, and how heavily the hand of the dead man weighted upon them.
Between the acts he mustered his following - three fellows he knew from the nail works, a railroad fireman, and half a dozen of the Boo Gang, along with as many more from the dread Eighteen-and- Market Gang.
A gang of French Canadians fell almost on top of him.
A gang of coiners, sir, discovered at Barkingham--in a house they used to call the Grange.
The officer who commanded this gang very wisely concluded that his business was now to deliver his prisoner into the hands of the civil magistrate.
At Yea, on the other hand, the personation and robbery would ever after be attributed to a member of the gang that had waylaid and murdered the new manager with that very object.
His gang, around him, was shouldering back those who tried to seize the money.
I had several proposals made also to me about that time, to come into a gang of house-breakers; but that was a thing I had no mind to venture at neither, any more than I had at the coining trade.
As far from home, died the chief remaining members of his friend Fagin's gang.
In Cincinnati he had lived in a neighborhood where gangs of tough boys prowled through the streets, and all through his early forma- tive years he ran about with tough boys.
Rose had formerly belonged to one of the gangs of pirates who infested the islands of the Mississippi, plundering boats as they went up and down the river, and who sometimes shifted the scene of their robberies to the shore, waylaying travellers as they returned by land from New Orleans with the proceeds of their downward voyage, plundering them of their money and effects, and often perpetrating the most atrocious murders.