Gamma

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Related to Gamma rays: Cosmic rays, electromagnetic spectrum

Gamma

The ratio of a change in the option delta to a small change in the price of the asset on which the option is written.

Gamma

A measure of how fast the delta changes. That is, gamma is a mathematical measurement of how fast the price of an option contract changes for each unit of change in the price of the underlying asset. The larger the gamma, the more volatile the option contract is. If an option is at the money or near the money, gamma is large, but if it is deep in or deep out of the money, gamma can become quite small. This is because when an option is near the money, a small change in the underlying asset's value can greatly change the level of demand for the contract. This is not the case for deep in and deep out of the money options.

gamma

The sensitivity of an option's delta to changes in the price of the underlying asset. The gamma of an option is greatest when an option is near the money (strike price close to market price of underlying asset) and near zero when an option is deep out of the money.
References in periodicals archive ?
28), annihilating each other and in the process producing gamma rays and energetic particles, such as positrons and antiprotons (the antimatter equivalents of electrons and protons, respectively).
Could the isotropic background of gamma rays be this smoking gun evidence of dark matter?
Called inverse Compton scattering, this process produces more gamma rays when the compact companion passes near the star on the far side of its orbit as seen from our perspective.
Gamma rays and x-rays can penetrate more matter than can lower-energy photons, but dense, high-Z material absorbs or scatters them.
Like cobalt gamma rays, X-rays can pass through thick foods, and require heavy shielding for safety.
The second trial measured not only the attenuation of gamma rays through determined breast tissue thickness (as in trial one), but also took into consideration the change in distance between the source of radiation and the detector, since radiation intensity decreases with increasing distance from the source (Knoll 1989).
14 pulse was also detected by the United States' Compton Gamma Ray Observatory satellite.
Like radio waves, visible light, and X rays, gamma rays are a form of electromagnetic radiation.
As a result, the crystal emits a sharply monochromatic beam of gamma rays, and this, discovered in 1958, is called the Mossbauer effect.
As each nucleus decays, it releases a positron which immediately collides with an electron, releasing two gamma rays that travel away from the collision zone at 180 degrees from each other.
These gamma rays could be produced as particles of dark matter annihilate one another.
The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) aboard NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope captured the initial wave of gamma rays from GRB 130427A shortly after 3:47 a.