Gamma

(redirected from Gamma rays)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Gamma rays: Cosmic rays, electromagnetic spectrum

Gamma

The ratio of a change in the option delta to a small change in the price of the asset on which the option is written.

Gamma

A measure of how fast the delta changes. That is, gamma is a mathematical measurement of how fast the price of an option contract changes for each unit of change in the price of the underlying asset. The larger the gamma, the more volatile the option contract is. If an option is at the money or near the money, gamma is large, but if it is deep in or deep out of the money, gamma can become quite small. This is because when an option is near the money, a small change in the underlying asset's value can greatly change the level of demand for the contract. This is not the case for deep in and deep out of the money options.

gamma

The sensitivity of an option's delta to changes in the price of the underlying asset. The gamma of an option is greatest when an option is near the money (strike price close to market price of underlying asset) and near zero when an option is deep out of the money.
References in periodicals archive ?
If that's true, then there should be a lot of gamma rays emanating from places where WIMPs are thought to be plentiful, like the dense centers of galaxies.
Electron beam, X-ray and gamma ray food irradiation facilities are all multimillion-dollar propositions.
The ability to detect gamma ray passage through fatty tissue has biomedical applications in the diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer.
A small contamination of deuterium in the target can produce gamma rays via [[right arrow].
The latest discovery, by the 6-year-old Compton satellite, could account for the missing gamma rays.
Natural sources of gamma rays on Earth include gamma decay from naturally occurring radioisotopes, and secondary radiation from atmospheric interactions with cosmic ray particles.
These clouds emit gamma rays when struck by high-speed particles escaping the remnants.
Gamma rays are extremely high-frequency radiation at wavelengths shorter than X-rays.
Eventually, the positrons collide with electrons in the material and are annihilated, releasing energy in the form of gamma rays.
The new catalogue, posted on the Arxiv server, lists the sources of the highest-energy gamma rays that Fermi has yet seen: 514 of them.
These findings provide new insight into the size of the Universe observable in gamma rays and shed light on the formation of stars and the evolution of galaxies.