Diaspora

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Diaspora

The persons of a community living outside their area or ancestral homeland, especially but not necessarily as a community. A diaspora can create and sustain trade and other economic ties between two areas. For example, a businessman from one ethnic group may communicate with a relative in the homeland in order to set up an import-export company.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Shekhinah (Shoshanah) has been in Galut, where our tradition tells us it went to accompany and preserve Israel in its wanderings among the nations (B.
Zionism gives the Jews the power to roll back the rock of the galut and "rise" to a new life in its new land, through which salvation is brought to the world.
In the 1970s, Jewish youth came from the Galut, and lived nearby to learn about their heritage and develop the organizational skills they needed to become Zionist leaders.
After briefly summarizing Yoder's embrace of galut as vocation and its implications for his understanding of Zionism, I will then look at probing critiques of Yoder regarding difference and land raised by two thinkers well acquainted with Yoder's work, Michael Cartwright and Peter Ochs.
So, too, Levinas' utopian Zionism is a Zionism more of elsewhere than of nowhere: a diasporic Zionism that speaks, therefore, from the powerless knowledge of death of children, and that calls out, against the negation of galut, to be thought through in relation to the debate on and within Postzionism.
The second way in which Berkovits utilized the rabbinic concept of Galut Ha-Shekhina was by describing this cosmic exile as the divine purpose of creation "that longs for and seeks its realization in the cosmos in general and in human history in particular.
4) As we can see, the attitude towards Jewish Galut or exile became very hostile in some parts of the Zionist movement.
In 1936, Yitzhak Baer published Galut (exile) stating conclusively, "The Jewish revival of the present day is in its essence not determined by the national movements of Europe; it harks back to the ancient national consciousness of the Jews, which existed before the history of EuropeAa and is the original sacred model for all the national ideas of Europe.
Of all of Herzl's family, only the Zionist is left behind in Galut.
Raz-Krakotzkin proposes to recover exile, or galut, as a critical
In a throwback to the fiction of Yizhar, the role of the Palestinian, Haled, embodied what one critic called the two "repressed others" in Israeli society--the Arab and the Galut Jew.
The hero of the literature of this generation is the perfect opposite of the Galut Jew.