Gaijin

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Gaijin

Japanese term used to describe a non-Japanese investor in Japan (outside person). A more polite version of the same word is gaikokujin which means outside country person.

Gaijin

The Japanese word for foreigner. The term is often used to describe non-Japanese persons and organizations who invest in Japanese securities.
References in periodicals archive ?
61) Gaikokujin tourokuho [Foreigners Registration Act], Law No 125 of 1952 (repealed in 2012); "Heiwa jouyaku no hakkou nitomonau chousenjin taiwanjinto nikansuru kokuseki oyobi koseki jimu no shori nitsuite [On Treatment of Koreans and Taiwanese for Nationality and Family Registration after the Peace Treaty Took Effect]", Houmuhu minjikyokucho tsutatsu [Ministry of Justice, Civil Division ChiefNotification], Ko 438 of 1952 (19 April 1952).
Zainichi gaikokujin to tabunka gyosei: Chiiki no siten kara [Foreign residents in multicultural Japan: Local community perspectives].
1998); Takamichi Kajita, Gaikokujin ROdOSHA TO NIHON [Foreign Workers and Japan] (1994); Atsushi KondO, "Gaikokujin" no Sanseiken: Denizunshippu no Hikaku Kenkyu [Suffrage for "Foreigners": Comparative Studies of Denizenship] (1996); Tadashi Hanami, Japanese Policies on the Rights and Benefits Granted to Foreign Workers, Residents, Refugees, and Illegals, in TEMPORARY WORKERS OF FUTURE CITIZENS: Japanese and U.
People of African descent and non-Japanese Asians are instead described by the term gaikokujin (person from a foreign country).
Gaikokujin tachiai saiban hokoku [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] [A report on foreign courts of justice].
Gaikokujin Kenkyusei or "Foreign Research Fellow" was the category specified on my university identification card.
Similarly in the academic milieu gaikokujin kyoshi (foreign instructors) are marginalised and education is controlled by an intellectual cartel.
183, 378), and gaikokujin 'alien' becomes gaigokujin (p.
As of 1990 there were about 268,000 holders of this type of permanent residence, while the number of holders of permanent residence under the 1965 Treaty amounted to about 323,000 (Zairyu Gaikokujin Tokei 1990).
4 For a detailed account of the construction of the foreign settlement in Nagasaki, see Hishitani Takehira, Nagasaki gaikokujin kyoryuchi no kenkyu [Research on the Nagasaki Foreign Settlement] (Fukuoka, 1988), 75-428.
Gaikokujin Rodosha to Keizai Shakai no Shinro (Tokyo: Okurasho Insatsukyoku, 1989).