GNP


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GNP

Gross National Product

A measure of the value of what a country's citizens produce in a given year, whether or not the production occurred in that country. To calculate GNP, one takes the GDP and adds to it all earnings made by domestic citizens in a different country. One then subtracts from this quantity all earnings made in the home country by non-citizens. GNP is less commonly used now because it has become a less accurate tool for calculating what a domestic economy produces, as more countries have citizens working abroad.

Gross national product (GNP).

The gross national product is a measure of a country's economic output -- the total value of all the goods and services that it produces in a particular year. The GNP is similar to the gross domestic product (GDP), but not exactly the same.

Unlike the GDP, the GNP includes the income generated by investments owned outside the country by its citizens, and excludes any income earned on domestic soil by noncitizens or organizations based elsewhere.

GNP

see GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT.

GNP

see GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT.
References in periodicals archive ?
Asked about the vision for GNP, Renata laughed and said that owner Dean Kutrumanes always says: We want to be big .
The 1989 Exxon Valdeez oil tanker disaster (which created one of the worst oil slicks in US history) increased Alaska's GNP because so much money was spent in cleaning up the oil and in the subsequent court cases.
Logically, if an increase in real GNP implies an increase in physical volume, no increase in physical volume implies no increase in real GNP, which was the point of Assertion 3.
The UC model used below to estimate permanent and transitory components of GNP was selected using the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) from a large set of competing models representing the GNP/consumption system.
Besides, since weighted foreign resources are considered an invariant measure of wealth of an economy, weights depend upon export earnings and GNP.
economy, is the suggestion that GNP can become stalled at low levels even when there is nothing wrong with the fundamentals of the economy.
The situation is different if the changes in real GNP and its major components are expressed in terms of 1987 prices and expenditure weights, however.
Military spending rose to almost 39 per cent of GNP.
If consumption--which accounts for two-thirds of GNP is in the throes of a major balance-sheet correction cycle, the arithmetic of GNP growth will be fundamentally weaker until the cycle has completed itself.
Between June 1991 and December 1991, real GNP rose at an annual rate of 1.
The GNP: The Commerce Department in late April 1991 estimated that the GNP dipped 2.