GI Bill


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GI Bill

Now called the Montgomery GI Bill, it offers support for veterans seeking postsecondary education.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944, more commonly know as the GI Bill of Rights, was said to be one of the most important pieces of legislation for servicemembers at that time.
Although some Americans might be inclined to question the timing and political motivation behind the so-called 21st Century GI Bill signed into law this week, the benefits of such programs - to the veterans and society alike - are beyond dispute.
Veterans headed back to school could get more financial help under a proposed boost in federal education benefits, but the future of the proposed new GI Bill is shaky: The Senate and House each have passed a version of the bill, but President Bush has threatened to veto it.
SOLDIERS TO CITIZENS: The GI Bill and the Making of the Greatest Generation.
After World War II, the GI bill dramatically lowered the cost of home ownership for millions of young Americans.
VFW should not advocate abolishing the participant's $1,200 buy-in to the Montgomery GI Bill It is an investment no one can afford to pass up.
A concluding chapter on the GI Bill carries a lot of interpretive freight.
Roosevelt signed the Servicemen's Readjustment Act, better known as the GI Bill of Rights or the GI Bill.
Bill: "Most recently, the GI Bill made available federal funds for tuition and upkeep in sectarian as well as nonsectarian schools.
Military service members are now eligible for a big increase in their Montgomery GI Bill benefits.
One of these is the educational program, the prime example of which is the GI Bill of 1944, which guaranteed free higher education to veterans.
All in all, the GI Bill added up to a major federal social policy in the postwar era.