Funded pension plan

(redirected from Funded Pension Plans)

Funded pension plan

A pension plan in which all liabilities, including payments to be made to pensioners in the immediate future, are completely funded.

Funded Pension Plan

A pension that has sufficient liquid assets to pay all of its liabilities, including (and especially) all future payments to beneficiaries.
References in periodicals archive ?
Companies with fully funded pension plans resent having to essentially overpay premiums in order to cover the mistakes made by bankrupt companies, whose legacy pension costs they are forced to cover to some extent.
In the past, the formulae that determined the range of annual contributions an employer could or must contribute to a pension plan were subjective, highly volatile and ultimately failed to provide for safely funded pension plans.
Ottawa--Four in five Canadians are uncertain about the future of their private and employer funded pension plans and believe that their plans are in crisis because of underfunding, according to a Conference Board of Canada survey.
The percentage of fully funded pension plans with over 1,000 members lowered from 84 percent in 1998 to 37 percent in 2002.
The author fears that if the system is not reformed, taxpayers ultimately may have to provide PBGC with the money needed to cover the liabilities of poorly funded pension plans.
Are funded pension plans necessary for retirement system reform?
funded plans, in line with the company s previously-disclosed long-term strategy to de-risk its funded pension plans.
Ironically, I find that poorly funded pension plans with higher actuarially assumed portfolio returns have a higher probability of investing in ETIs.
In Japan, the pension coverage rate for funded pension plans was 39 percent in 1989, although most other employees are in unfunded severance plans.
The return to fully funded pension plans got sidetracked somewhat last year," said Mike Archer, senior retirement consultant at Towers Watson.
The credit profile for the city's long-term obligations is mixed, with moderate debt levels and manageable capital needs offset by poorly funded pension plans.
Moreover, these DC accounts are individually managed and are a poor substitute for group funded pension plans, because of the absence of investment expertise by individuals, the absence of a shared cost of disability and survivorship benefits, lack of annuitization at retirement, and the heavy expense of maintaining the individual accounts.