Full-service broker

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Full-service broker

A broker who provides clients an all-inclusive selection of services such as advice on security selection and financial planning.

Full-Service Broker

A brokerage that provides transaction services in addition to research and investment advice. That is, a full-service broker works with clients to determine and execute clients' investment goals; brokers may conduct the transactions the clients direct or they may independently manage portfolios for clients. Full-service brokerage firms provide individual services, and, as a result, charge much higher commissions than discount brokerage firms. However, they are not as exclusive as boutiques.
References in periodicals archive ?
Opening an account generally costs less and the cost of trades is lower than with full-service brokers.
Retirement plans are available through both mutual fund companies, such as Putnam, and full-service brokers, such as Fidelity, for example.
Because full-service brokers offer a number of services, including tax advice and stock research, not offered by most discount and online firms.
About 45 people work in Indianapolis, and 28 of those employees are full-service brokers.
Customers not taking advantage of the entire range of services offered by their brokers may not completely realize the value that full-service brokers offer.
For five years, state securities regulators have proposed to the SEC that limited-purpose brokers--those affiliated with life insurers--be regulated like full-service brokers, the kind found at a brokerage house such as Merrill Lynch, said Carl Wilkerson, chief counsel for securities with the American Council of Life Insurers.
Discount brokers usually offer cheaper margin rates than full-service brokers.
How he got started: Kawashima used to rely on his full-service brokers for investment advice.
Rather than mainly relying on full service brokers and transaction-based advisors, 30 percent of affluent Asian Americans depend on fee-based Certified Financial Planners as their primary financial advisor as opposed to eight percent that count on full-service brokers.
You should buy SPDRs from discount brokerage firms, which charge lower commissions than full-service brokers.
Full-service brokers want to avoid losing business to discount brokerages as investors become more comfortable with interactive investing and it accelerates.