Amicus Curiae

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Amicus Curiae

Latin for "friend of the court." A person who is not a party to a case but offers expert or other relevant information on a point of law in order to help the judge or jury make a decision. An amicus curiae may offer testimony (provided it is unsolicited by either party in the case) or write a brief or legal treatise on the matter at hand. The court has full discretion whether or not to accept the statement of an amicus curiae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many religious groups have filed friend-of-the-court briefs opposing sectarian invocations before meetings of the Forsyth County (N.
However, in the friend-of-the-court brief filed in February, APHA and fellow health and consumer organizations state that New York City's menu rules fall "squarely within the sphere that Congress intentionally left open to state and local governments.
The ADF filed a friend-of-the-court brief with the 3rd Circuit arguing that school officials unconstitutionally silenced religious speech.
For health-conscious adults who wanted to quit smoking but were unable to do so because they were addicted, switching to cigarettes with lower tar and nicotine yields seemed an attractive alternative, allowing them to maintain their addiction while supposedly mitigating the health risk," the friend-of-the-court brief said.
In a friend-of-the-court brief, Moore's group asserts that the provision in the First Amendment barring laws "respecting an establishment of religion" protects no individual rights--a position that has been adopted by Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas.
Organizations of home builders complained in a friend-of-the-court brief that U.
The friend-of-the-court brief called the Illinois Supreme Court's decision "deeply disturbing" and contends that the "light cigarette fraud perpetuated on the American public was one of the most heinous health frauds carried out in this nation's history.
Led by The Interfaith Alliance, a diverse array of religious organizations filed a friend-of-the-court brief with the 3rd U.
New York, New Jersey and 35 other states filed a friend-of-the-court brief urging the justices to uphold the law.
Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, where the ACLJ submitted a friend-of-the-court brief in support of the President.
Americans United for Separation of Church and State filed a friend-of-the-court brief that urged the appeals court to rule against government funding of religion.
In a 15-page friend-of-the-court brief, the ACLU contended the gag order violates the First Amendment.