Amicus Curiae

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Amicus Curiae

Latin for "friend of the court." A person who is not a party to a case but offers expert or other relevant information on a point of law in order to help the judge or jury make a decision. An amicus curiae may offer testimony (provided it is unsolicited by either party in the case) or write a brief or legal treatise on the matter at hand. The court has full discretion whether or not to accept the statement of an amicus curiae.
References in periodicals archive ?
The friend of the court brief is an action filed by a person or organization who is not a party to the lawsuit, but believes it has evidence or perspective that would help the court make its decision.
Attorneys for the district have filed a friend of the court brief in support of a challenge to the initiative filed by the Mexican American Legal Defense Fund.
In support of that petition, the State of California, 33 other states and the District of Columbia, filed a friend of the court brief also requesting the Supreme Court to review the Court of Appeals verdict.
ITAA filed an "Amicus Curiae" or friend of the court brief supporting Microsoft's position in the case in June 1999.