SYR

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Related to Freyja: Freya, Odin

SYR

GOST 7.67 Latin three-letter geocode for Syria. The code is used for transactions to and from Syrian bank accounts and for international shipping to Syria. As with all GOST 7.67 codes, it is used primarily in Cyrillic alphabets.
References in periodicals archive ?
Si comparamos este mito con la perdida y posterior recuperacion del martillo de Tor, encontramos analogos elementos: el engano en la figura de Tor vistiendose de Freyja para recuperar el martillo, la imprudencia en dejarse robar el martillo mientras descansaba y la demostracion de fuerza en el combate entre Thrym y Tor.
Some would say Laurens needs such linguistic posturing to inflate a play that, in outline, could not be more familiar: a Christmas season clash between a father (Calder), his two sons (Keen and Lewis), and their wives (McCrory and Indira Varma), the last of whom come bearing names by way of Shakespeare and Ibsen--Miranda and Freyja.
The Goddess Freyja and Other Female Figures in Germanic Mythology and Folklore.
Freyja Halman and Clive Fletcher(*) Goldsmiths' College, University of London, UK
Half of them lived with Odin in Valhalla (val means battlefield) and the other half with Freyja in Folkvang (folk meaning men arrayed for battle).
Finally, Orton particularly hesitates to accept the corollary of his position by identifying the Wife as either the Germanic Great Goddess herself, Freyja, or some personification or equivalent thereof, an identification for which I shall argue.
Freyja had charge of love, fertility, battle, and death.
The 11-metre wooden ketch Freyja was built in 1945 in California.
Wonderful Grandad of Danielle, Stacey, Shaun and Liam, Great Grandad of Jude, Anna and Freyja.
LINGARD Les Cherished husband of Helen, dearly beloved dad of Kate and darling grandad of Freyja, Florence and Stanley.
Regarding the specific implications of The False One, Freyja Cox Jensen argues that Fletcher and Massinger joined the ranks of those who 'appropriated Lucan for anti-court purposes, reflecting contemporary concerns for James' perceived closeness with Spain, and the crisis of the Palatinate'.