Fraudulent Conveyance

(redirected from Fraudulent Intent)
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Fraudulent Conveyance

The transfer of property to another party in order to defraud a creditor. For example, if a person owes the bank for a loan for $15,000, the person may give or sell $15,000 worth of property to a relative, often while still maintaining use of the property, in order to prevent the bank from being repaid. Legally, fraudulent conveyance requires the intention to defraud a creditor.
References in periodicals archive ?
2008) ("We have repeatedly held that fraudulent intent may be
To determine whether there was enough circumstantial evidence to support a finding of fraudulent intent, the court reviewed the evidence for "badges of fraud.
If not completed within 48 hours, we will be forced to suspend your account indefinitely, because it can be used in a fraudulent intent.
California Penal Code ASS 550 does not require that the defendant make a false statement in support of his or her own claim, nor does it require that the insurance claim itself be filed with fraudulent intent.
In short, a transferee faces two possible scenarios in which a payment may be challenged under fraudulent transfer laws--challenges to transfers involving actual fraudulent intent and challenges to transfers where no fraudulent intent was necessarily present but the transfer was for less than fair value during the debtor's insolvency, or it rendered the debtor insolvent (as in the first two examples above).
Although this would appear to be tantamount to an allegation of knowing and fraudulent intent.
THE Insolvency Service has liaised with West Midlands police to close down a group of 98 companies formed and run with fraudulent intent.
45) The Court, however, did not limit this exception to situations involving the defendant's fraudulent intent or knowledge, as was the case at common law and currently is the approach taken by many federal courts interpreting FRCP 9(b).
Hlady, with fraudulent intent and without authorization, obtained personal identifying information about local philanthropist Arthur Remillard Jr.
His defense was that 'I had no fraudulent intent,' which is one aspect of the law.
It is not possible for abusive customers, or those with fraudulent intent, to arbitrarily reverse their payment and letting the merchant bear the cost.
The given photo was used without any fraudulent intent and without intention to violate someone's copyright.