Form 8300

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Form 8300

A form one files with the IRS to report cash payments in excess of $10,000 that one receives in the conduct of business. These payments are documented in order to discourage potential money laundering. Publication 1544 explains how to file Form 8300.
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Bale wants its money back and an order stating that the company didn't "intentionally disregard" its obligation to file the four Forms 8300.
TURANO was convicted on April 18, 2002 by a trial jury of obstruction of justice, failure to file IRS Forms 8300, and false statements.
Forms 8300 are collected by the IRS Detroit Computing Center and the information contained therein is entered into a data base.
Quite often attorneys will file Forms 8300 without disclosing their clients' identities, claiming that the attorney-client privilege prohibits such disclosure.
Nevertheless, the Service does not want to have to expend the resources to issue summonses to attorneys who fail to file complete Forms 8300 identifying the payors.
A possible indicator of the low compliance is through a comparison of the number of Currency Transaction Reports (CTRs) filed by financial institutions to the number of Forms 8300 filed.
The primary purpose behind currency reporting -- whether Currency Transaction Reports filed by financial institutions or Forms 8300 filed by businesses -- is to identify people dealing in large amounts of cash.
Forms 8300 are important to IRS for reasons other than their value as a weapon in the war on drugs.
Businesses file Forms 8300 with the Internal Revenue Service's Detroit Computing Center.
In 1990 only 270 Forms 8300 were filed by businesses in Tennessee while cash reports filed by banks indicated huge amounts of currency flowing through the state.